Tag Archives: cattle

Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.8 million head on March 1, 2019. The inventory was 1% above March 1, 2018, USDA reported Friday.

Placements in feedlots during February totaled 1.86 million head, 2% above 2018. Net placements were 1.79 million head. During February, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 340,000 head, 600-699 pounds were 345,000 head, 700-799 pounds were 530,000 head, 800-899 pounds were 442,000 head, 900-999 pounds were 135,000 head, and 1,000 pounds and greater were 65,000 head.

Listen to Jerry Stowell, Country Futures, break down the report:

https://post.futurimedia.com/krvnam/playlist/cattle-on-feed-report-3-22-w-jerry-stowell-6342.html

Marketings of fed cattle during February totaled 1.68 million head, slightly above 2018.

Other disappearance totaled 66,000 head during February, 16% above 2018.

“The March 1 Cattle on Feed report appears to be generally bearish based on stronger-than-expected cattle placement through February,” said DTN Analyst Rick Kment. “Total feeder cattle placements was 102% of 2018 levels with 1.857 million cattle placed in feed yards. This placement is 6% over early report expectations and just slightly above the top end of the market range. Total cattle on feed came in 1.3% above expectations with a total on feed level of 101% year-ago levels.

“The market impact of the report may not be fully seen due to the wide market shifts seen through the week and uncertainty over how cattle inventory will change through the rest of the spring due to recent winter storms and floods.”

To view the full Cattle on Feed report, visit https://www.nass.usda.gov/…

USDA Pre-report Estimates
Actual Avg Low High
On feed March 1 101.0% 99.7% 99.0% 100.6%
On feed February 1 100.0%
Placed on feed during February 102.0% 96.0% 92.2% 101.5%
Fed cattle marketed during February 100.0% 100.8% 99.7% 101.3%

Marketings of fed cattle during February totaled 1.68 million head, slightly above 2018.

Other disappearance totaled 66,000 head during February, 16% above 2018.

“The March 1 Cattle on Feed report appears to be generally bearish based on stronger-than-expected cattle placement through February,” said DTN Analyst Rick Kment. “Total feeder cattle placements was 102% of 2018 levels with 1.857 million cattle placed in feed yards. This placement is 6% over early report expectations and just slightly above the top end of the market range. Total cattle on feed came in 1.3% above expectations with a total on feed level of 101% year-ago levels.

“The market impact of the report may not be fully seen due to the wide market shifts seen through the week and uncertainty over how cattle inventory will change through the rest of the spring due to recent winter storms and floods.”

To view the full Cattle on Feed report, visit https://www.nass.usda.gov/…

USDA Pre-report Estimates
Actual Avg Low High
On feed March 1 101.0% 99.7% 99.0% 100.6%
On feed February 1 100.0%
Placed on feed during February 102.0% 96.0% 92.2% 101.5%
Fed cattle marketed during February 100.0% 100.8% 99.7% 101.3%

LINCOLN, NE – As the flood water recedes and snow melts, farmers and ranchers are getting a better look at the amount of damage their operations have suffered from last week’s extreme weather events.

One of the more significant losses experienced by landowners has been livestock death. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service has assistance available to help landowners cope with the aftermath of livestock death.

Through NRCS’ Environmental Quality Incentives Program, commonly referred to as EQIP, farmers and ranchers can apply for assistance to properly dispose of dead livestock. Applications are being accepted now through July 1, 2019.

NRCS State Conservationist Craig Derickson said, “This was an unprecedented and devastating event for Nebraska. Some ranchers are dealing with hundreds of dead animals. This is not only damaging to their bottom-line, but if these animals are not disposed of properly, there could be negative impacts to water quality and other natural resources. NRCS conservationists are available to provide technical and financial assistance to help producers dispose of livestock carcasses in a safe manner.”

Producers who have not already disposed of livestock can apply for EQIP now. Producers can then get a waiver to allow them to begin working to dispose of deceased livestock before having an approved EQIP contract.

“Typically, producers cannot begin working on an EQIP practice before their EQIP contract has been approved. But since this situation is so time-critical, NRCS is encouraging producers to sign up for EQIP first, then submit a waiver to go ahead and begin animal disposal prior to having their EQIP contract approved,” Derickson said.

Producers in the area who suffered other damages due to the blizzard and flooding – such as damaged fencing, water sources, or windbreaks – may also seek assistance from NRCS through general EQIP funding. The sign-up period for general EQIP is continuous and has no cut off application date.

Derickson said, “NRCS is committed to helping producers get back on their feet after these extreme weather events while also ensuring Nebraska’s natural environment remains healthy and productive.”

For more information about the programs and assistance available from NRCS, visit your local USDA Service Center orwww.ne.nrcs.usda.gov.

RAPID CITY, S.D. — The South Dakota Stockgrowers Association is excited to announce that Governor Kristi Noem has signed Senate Bill 68, the “Fake Meat” bill.

SB 68 relies on existing statutory definitions of meat food products and meat by-products and makes it clear that a food product may not be labeled in a false, deceptive, or misleading manner that intentionally misrepresents the product as a meat food product as defined in § 39-5-6, a meat by-product as defined in § 39-5-6, or as poultry (as defined in the bill).

Lab-grown meats are moving closer to market introduction. The South Dakota Stockgrowers Association believes these alternative products need to be clearly delineated from actual meat and should not be allowed to benefit from the generations of hard work that have gone in to creating the current day market for actual meat food products. Consequently, The SDSGA is grateful to the legislature and to the Governor for stepping up and providing leadership on this issue for producers and consumers in South Dakota.

“The Fake Meat bill was legislation to which we dedicated a great deal of time this legislative session. Not only is this bill good for our agricultural producers, but it is also great for consumers, as it gives them the knowledge they need when making decisions at the grocery store for their families,” said Gary Deering, South Dakota Stockgrowers President.

“This was a fun bill to lobby. Soliciting sponsors for legislation can be a challenging task. SB 68 was that rare bill that was so popular legislators were coming to us and asking to sign on.” exclaimed Jeremiah M. Murphy, Stockgrowers’ lobbyist. “We received great support from legislators and from a broad spectrum of SD agriculture groups.

“My first Legislative session has been a great one for the Stockgrowers. Seeing this bill signed puts the icing on the cake.” said James Halverson, Stockgrowers’ Executive Director. “It has been fun and rewarding working on an idea like this. It started at the grass roots level, at a meeting of ours, and drew increasing support as it went through all of the legislative steps up to and including the governor’s signature. This truly goes to show what a difference organizations like the Stockgrowers can make,” added Halverson.

“We are grateful to the legislature and especially the bill’s prime sponsors, Sen. Art Rusch and Rep. Oren Lesmeister, for their leadership and hard work on this bill,” said Deering. “We are also grateful to Governor Noem. At the beginning of session she asked Jeremiah and I for the Stockgrowers’ priorities, and we told her the fake meat bill was at the top of our list. We appreciate her support in signing SB 68. She deserves a lot of credit for standing up for South Dakota producers.” added Deering.

From UNL BeefWatch online magazine

The Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP), administered by the USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA), provides compensation to eligible livestock producers who have suffered livestock death losses in excess of normal mortality due to adverse weather, including extreme cold, storms and flooding.

With the extreme weather conditions Nebraska has been experiencing this winter, it is important livestock producers diligently document and report their death losses for possible LIP payments.

To be eligible for LIP payments, a producer must file a notice of loss on form CCC-852 with his/her local FSA office within 30 calendar days of when the death losses become apparent. The producer can then file an application for payment to request compensation for losses in excess of the normal annual mortality rate. This must be completed no later than March 1, 2020.

Multiple notices of losses and multiple applications for payment may be filed by producers that suffer multiple livestock losses during the same calendar year. Once a qualifying weather event has been identified, adult livestock dying within 60 days of that qualifying event can be considered eligible for loss benefits.

Good record-keeping habits should be part of the livestock manager’s DNA anyway, but it is at times like these that those habits can really pay dividends. The logical question to ask any producer submitting an LIP notice of loss and application for payment to an FSA office is, “How can you verify what you are trying to tell us?” Producers should provide records of the pertinent information regarding the livestock losses suffered due to an eligible adverse weather event, including things such as the number, kind, type and weight range of livestock that died, supplemented with dated photographs, video records, rendering receipts, or veterinarian records.

A photograph with a camera or smart phone showing the date the loss occurred can be a quick and simple record of the losses incurred. For calving losses, document death losses in your calving book with clear notes as to what exactly caused the death. 

LIP payments are calculated based on eligible death losses in excess of normal annual mortality. Normal mortality rates are established by FSA on a state-by-state basis using recommendations from state livestock and Extension Service organizations. The normal mortality rates established for beef cattle in Nebraska are:

Adult: Cows and bulls, 1.5 percent

Non-adults: 800 pounds or more, 1 percent; 400 to 799 pounds, 2 percent; less than 400 pounds, 5 percent

Producers need accurate inventory counts showing the number and type of livestock that were affected by the eligible event. Beginning and ending year inventory numbers supplemented with production records, purchase records, sale records, veterinarian records, inventory related bank loan documentation, and other reliable documents can help verify livestock inventories at different points throughout the year.

It is important for producers to realize that normal death losses that occur throughout the year are equally important to document and verify. For example, suppose a Nebraska beef cattle producer owns 400 pregnant cows at the beginning of the calendar year. Veterinary records of the fall pregnancy check and the producer’s own inventory records would help verify this information. This producer’s normal annual mortality would be five cows and 20 calves based on the rates for the state of Nebraska. Following an eligible adverse weather event, the producer is able to verify the loss of four cows and twenty-two calves due to the event by filing a notice of loss on form CCC-852 with the local FSA office along with the supporting evidence.

Based on this information, the producer could file a request for compensation on two calves in excess of the normal mortality rate. However, the producer also documents normal death losses throughout the year that account for the loss of ten more calves and three cows.

In summary, the producer’s LIP application(s) for payment could then request compensation for 12 calves and two cows. This would be the amount the producer’s annual death losses would exceed normal mortality rates and be within the confines of the documented death losses attributed to the eligible weather event.

The LIP payment rates are based on 75 percent of the national market value of the livestock. For example, the 2018 payment rate for a cow would have been $983.90 per head and a calf under 400 pounds would have been $468.92 per head.

Payment rates have not yet been set for 2019 losses, but still are a potentially important cost recovery from the financial impacts of losing a larger than normal number of animals.

A Livestock Indemnity Program Factsheet is available on the USDA Farm Service Agency website. The URL is https://www.fsa.usda.gov/Assets/USDA-FSA-Public/usdafiles/FactSheets/2018/livestock_indemnity_program_fact_sheet_dec_2018.pdf

Also, contact your local FSA Office for more information on the LIP program.

(Video) ‘BOMB CYCLONE’; Damage and Looses from in Nebraska More than $1 Billion

It has been a week since the historic bomb cyclone blizzard, brought rain and snow to areas of the Panhandle and eastern Wyoming.

The blizzard dropped anywhere from 10 to 12 inches with the wind creating drifts up to 6ft or more. Cattle losses are still yet to be tallied, but where some ranchers or feedlots lost a handful of cattle or calves, others have lost in the hundreds.

“Now we’re dealing with the melting snow and road damages, we have some flood advisories out, as we have minor flooding,” said Nan Gould Emergency 23 Dawes County management coordinator.

The melting snow is keeping livestock producers on their toes, trying to keep cattle and new calves secure and dry.

“We are fighting some pneumonia (cases) post-storm, we’ve had several sunny days, so it’s helped some bounce back, but diligence is going to be important there’s a lot of stressed animals out there,” said Becky Funk veterinarian at the Rushville Veterinary Clinic

The quickly melting snow is creating small lakes in some pens and open fields where the cattle are looking to bed.

“It’s a mess with all the mud for cattle to try to find dry places to lay and to get feed moved around in the mud,” Funk said.

While the snow is creating problems for livestock producers, farmers have welcomed the moisture.

“We’re fairly lucky around here,” said Scott Sterkel grain division manager at Farmers Coop in Hemingford. “It could have been worse, there is a lot of snow with refrozen water on the fields, but I don’t think we’ll have any huge delays around here.”

Winter wheat is the only crop in the ground at this time and Sterkel said, it’s hard to gauge any damage to the crop just yet.

“You almost have to wait for it to come out of dormancy to see what happens,” he said. “We’ll probably have some winter kill, some valleys will probably wash out when it (snow) starts melting. Right now, it’s too early to tell.

A chance of moisture is in the forecast again for Friday, March 22, with temperatures expected to stay in the 50s.

Rain is also scheduled for the eastern part of Nebraska where flooding has swallowed up farms and ranches.

KNEB and the Nebraska Broadcasters Association will conduct the “#NebraskaStrong Drive for Flood Relief” with the American Red Cross March 22. Stay tuned for more information on how you can help.

Livestock groups warn any trade allowing Brazil to export beef to the U.S. would put the U.S. beef industry at risk. President Donald Trump and his counterpart from Brazil discussed trade issues Tuesday, including beef, sugar and ethanol. However, some livestock groups expressed concern regarding the potential reopening of fresh beef exports to the U.S. market.

The United States Cattlemen’s Association reiterated its strong opposition to the move that the organization says would compromise the “health of the domestic cattle herd for the sake of increased beef exports, especially from a country marred by scandal.” The group urged President Trump and Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue to strongly consider potential animal health issues stemming from possible trade with Brazil, including the 2017 discovery that Brazilian meat inspectors had been caught accepting bribes to allow expired meats to be sold and sanitary permits to be falsified.

 Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.7 million head on Feb. 1, 2019. The inventory was slightly above Feb. 1, 2018, USDA reported Friday.

The February report was delayed due to the partial federal government shutdown in January. The March 1 Cattle on Feed report will be released on its originally scheduled time at 2 p.m. CST on Friday, March 22.

Jerry Stowell with Country Futures has a break down of the report: https://post.futurimedia.com/krvnam/playlist/cattle-on-feed-report-with-jerry-stowell-6239.html

Placements in feedlots during January totaled 1.96 million head, 5% below 2018. Net placements were 1.90 million head. During January, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 370,000 head, 600-699 pounds were 445,000 head, 700-799 pounds were 554,000 head, 800-899 pounds were 420,000 head, 900-999 pounds were 100,000 head, and 1,000 pounds and greater were 70,000 head.

Marketings of fed cattle during January totaled 1.91 million head, 3% above 2018.

Other disappearance totaled 61,000 head during January, 12% below 2018.

To view the full Cattle on Feed report, visit https://www.nass.usda.gov/…

USDA Pre-report Estimates
Actual Avg Low High
On feed February 1 100.0% 100.2% 99.1% 100.6%
On feed January 1 102.0%
Placed on feed during January 95.0% 92.6% 87.0% 95.9%
Fed cattle marketed during January 103.0% 102.3% 96.9% 102.9%

Today Jennifer Houston, president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, and Bob Skinner, president of the Public Lands Council, released a joint statement in response to the Department of Interior’s announcement that it will publish a gray wolf delisting rule in the Federal Register:

“The recovery of the gray wolf in the United States is a conservation success story. When the federal government collaborates with state wildlife officials and local land managers, it enhances our ability to protect the wildlife and ecosystems that we all cherish. This is exactly how the Endangered Species Act is supposed to work.

“Unfortunately, as ranchers know all too well, the current Endangered Species Act rarely functions as Congress originally intended. Radical environmental activists use an endless cycle of lawsuits and procedural tricks to thwart effective conservation. That is why it has taken so long to delist the gray wolf, even though science has long shown the species had reached stable population levels. That is also why the Endangered Species Act’s overall effectiveness hovers at an abysmal rate of just two percent.

“The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and Public Lands Council would like to commend Acting Secretary Bernhardt and his team for making this science-based decision. We look forward to continuing our work with the Department of Interior and state wildlife agencies as this process moves forward.”

Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.7 million head on Jan. 1, 2019. The inventory was 2% above Jan. 1, 2018, USDA reported Friday.

Listen to Jerry Stowell break down the report here: https://post.futurimedia.com/krvnam/playlist/cattle-on-feed-report-2-22-with-jerry-stowell-6156.html

The inventory included 7.28 million steers and steer calves, down 1% from the previous year. This group accounted for 62% of the total inventory. Heifers and heifer calves accounted for 4.41 million head, up 6% from 2018.

Placements in feedlots during December totaled 1.77 million head, 2% below 2018. Net placements were 1.69 million head. During December, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 445,000 head, 600-699 pounds were 460,000 head, 700-799 pounds were 402,000 head, 800-899 pounds were 285,000 head, 900-999 pounds were 90,000 head, and 1,000 pounds and greater were 85,000 head.

Marketings of fed cattle during December totaled 1.74 million head, 1% below 2017.

Other disappearance totaled 75,000 head during December, 1% above 2017.

To view the full Cattle on Feed report, visit https://www.nass.usda.gov/…

USDA Actual Average Guess Range
Cattle on Feed:
On Feed Jan. 1 102.0% 102.2% 101.3-102.6%
Placed in December 98.0% 101.4% 95.1-103.8%
Marketed in December 99.0% 99.7% 99.3-101.9%

It’s been a tough winter for farmers, especially for beef and dairy producers. Extreme weather across a good chunk of the nation have resulted in some excessive livestock deaths.

Ranchers who have experienced those losses may be eligible to recover some of those losses, thanks to the Livestock Indemnity Program.  A Drovers article says the program provides needed benefits to eligible livestock producers who suffer the deaths of livestock outside the normal range of mortality, due to conditions like adverse weather, disease, and predator attacks.

Eligible losses don’t automatically trigger payments. Livestock owners must provide evidence of such losses to the Farm Service Agency. To qualify for program benefits, livestock must have died in excess of normal mortality rates as a direct result of eligible loss conditions, such as weather or predators.

Livestock farmers also qualify for the benefit if livestock were injured due to an eligible loss condition and were sold at a reduced price because of that injury. If death losses occur, producers are reminded to record the date, take pictures, and report it directly to the Farm Service Agency.