Tag Archives: Chickens

All layers in Nebraska during May 2019 totaled 8.82 million, up from 7.78 million the previous year, according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Nebraska egg production during May totaled 223 million eggs, up from 201 million in 2018. May egg production per 100 layers was 2,527 eggs, compared to 2,584 eggs in 2018.

May Egg Production Up 3 Percent
United States egg production totaled 9.56 billion during May 2019, up 3 percent from last year. Production included 8.35 billion table eggs, and 1.21 billion hatching eggs, of which 1.12 billion were broiler-type and 90.9 million were egg-type. The average number of layers during May 2019 totaled 398 million, up 2 percent from last year. May egg production per 100 layers was 2,404 eggs, up 2 percent from May 2018.

All layers in the United States on June 1, 2019 totaled 395 million, up 1 percent from last year. The 395 million layers consisted of 332 million layers producing table or market type eggs, 59.9 million layers producing broiler-type hatching eggs, and 3.46 million layers producing egg-type hatching eggs. Rate of lay per day on June 1, 2019, averaged 77.9 eggs per 100 layers, up 2 percent from June 1, 2018.

Egg-Type Chicks Hatched Up 2 Percent
Egg-type chicks hatched during May 2019 totaled 60.8 million, up 2 percent from May 2018. Eggs in incubators totaled 51.6 million on June 1, 2019, up 3 percent from a year ago. Domestic placements of egg-type pullet chicks for future hatchery supply flocks by leading breeders totaled 215 thousand during May 2019, up 16 percent from May 2018.

Broiler-Type Chicks Hatched Up 2 Percent
Broiler-type chicks hatched during May 2019 totaled 856 million, up 2 percent from May 2018. Eggs in incubators totaled 703 million on June 1, 2019, up 1 percent from a year ago. Leading breeders placed 8.77 million broiler-type pullet chicks for future domestic hatchery supply flocks during May 2019, up 6 percent from May 2018.

 

 

An invasion of gnats is presenting a risk to the health and lives of livestock in a southern Minnesota town.

The Mankato Free Press reports that gnats cause weight loss and stress for any animal with their bites and by gathering around eyes and in airways.

Brooke Knisley, who runs an organic produce farm with her husband in St. Peter, says one of her friends has lost 16 chickens to the gnats this year. Knisley says she’s trying to reduce the risk for her own flock by running fans in the chicken coop, hanging fly strips and placing vanilla-soaked rags near where the gnats congregate.

Gnats are also an irritant for cattle and horses, and many owners are keeping their animals inside until the invasion passes.