Tag Archives: ethanol

ORLANDO— The Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) is pleased to announce its 2019 Industry Award is being awarded to East Kansas Agri-Energy (EKAE), an ethanol and renewable diesel biorefinery in Garnett, Kan. RFA presented the award to the board and staff of EKAE today at the 24th annual National Ethanol Conference (NEC).
RFA’s Industry Award recognizes companies or individuals who have made a significant contribution to the U.S. fuel ethanol industry through technology innovative, market development, consumer education, policy advocacy, and other efforts.
“This year’s recipient checks more than one of those boxes,” said Geoff Cooper, RFA President and CEO. “This is a company that has embraced new technologies, led the way in promoting new markets for E15, and last year, in particular, demonstrated remarkable leadership in advocating for ethanol and defending the RFS during a very challenging time for our industry.”
In June 2018, EKAE hosted then-EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt for a tour of the plant and a discussion about ethanol and the RFS. Pruitt had just issued 48 RFS compliance exemptions to “small refiners,” eliminating 2.25 billion gallons in renewable fuel blending requirements.
“When he got to EKAE, Pruitt was met by a firm and well-prepared group of ethanol industry advocates that refused to be intimidated,” Cooper said. “In a discussion that lasted for over an hour, East Kansas leaders made sure Pruitt got the message about the devastating impact of his small refinery waivers on the ethanol industry and farmers.”
In March 2018, Paul Teutul, Jr., chose East Kansas as the backdrop to unveil the RFA’s custom E85 motorcycle. The unveiling was featured on the Discovery Channel’s American Chopper show last summer. Not only did the episode showcase the ethanol-powered motorcycle, but it gave the EKAE board and staff an invaluable opportunity to tell ethanol’s story to viewers around the world.
Cooper also recognized EKAE for its groundbreaking renewable diesel project, its role in making E15 available at retail for the very first time in 2012, and for taking top EPA officials on a plant tour the day before a pivotal RFS hearing in Kansas City in 2015.
Open since 2005, EKAE operates a 48 million gallon per year ethanol plant that also produces more than 200,000 tons per year of high-quality distiller grains, in both wet and dry form. The biorefinery also produces 5 million pounds of corn oil each year from more than 16 million bushels of locally sourced corn.
ORLANDO— Today at the 24th annual National Ethanol Conference, the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) released its 2019 Ethanol Industry Outlook and Pocket Guide, known around the world as the go-to sources for reliable information and data on America’s ethanol industry.
The annual Outlook publication provides policymakers, regulators, consumers, the media, and renewable fuel advocates with key statistics, trends, insight, and analysis on the latest developments in the U.S. renewable fuels industry, as well as commentary on what to expect in 2019. The publication also features a detailed listing of every fuel ethanol plant in the country, along with production capacity.
The Pocket Guide to Ethanol contains much of the same information as the Outlook, but in an abbreviated format and smaller size.
“For 18 years, RFA’s annual Outlook publication has served as the ‘Ethanol Bible,’ full of the facts, figures, and analysis that inform our advocacy and outreach efforts,” said RFA President and CEO Geoff Cooper. “This year’s Outlook is especially useful in offering insight into the impacts of small refiner exemptions and trade wars on our markets in 2018, but also highlights the good news of expanded retail offerings of E15 and flex fuels, record ethanol exports, and ethanol’s incredible impact on job creation and the economy.”
A new study released today finds that the expanded Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) has been a tremendous success in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, with nearly 600 million metric tons of GHG reduction since 2007. Actual GHG reductions under the RFS2 have far surpassed the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) original expectations of 422 million metric tons, according to the study. The analysis was conducted by Life Cycle Associates, a California-based scientific consulting firm, and commissioned by the Renewable Fuels Foundation (RFF).
The findings, which come as two House committees hold climate change hearings this morning, highlight the important role that ethanol and other biofuels can play in efforts to fight climate change and reduce GHG emissions.
“The RFS2 has resulted in significant GHG reductions, with cumulative CO2 savings of 600 million metric tonnes over the period of implementation,” according to the study. “The GHG reductions are due to the greater than expected savings from ethanol and other biofuels. These emissions savings occur even though cellulosic biofuels have not met the RFS2 production targets. Biofuels have achieved and exceeded the GHG reductions estimated by EPA.”
As outlined in the report, the larger-than-expected GHG reductions are due to:
  • The adoption of technology improvements in the production of corn-based ethanol, resulting in far greater GHG reductions than originally estimated by EPA;
  • The GHG emissions of petroleum are higher than the baseline estimates originally projected by EPA; and
  • Advanced biofuels like biodiesel, renewable diesel, and renewable natural gas have contributed additional GHG reductions, even though actual cellulosic biofuel production has been lower than initially projected.
Using the latest available data and modeling tools, the study found that the conventional ethanol consumed in 2018 reduced GHG emissions by 43 percent compared to petroleum, even when hypothetical “land use change” are included. That compares to EPA’s initial projections that conventional ethanol would achieve only a 20 percent GHG reduction versus petroleum.
“As this study demonstrates, renewable fuels like ethanol are an incredibly effective tool for reducing GHG emissions,” said Geoff Cooper, President and CEO of the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA). “And with renewable fuels, we don’t need to cross our fingers and wait for the development and commercialization of a new technology. Ethanol is available here and now to help our nation decarbonize our transportation fuels in a cost effective manner. As the new Congress turns its focus to climate change and efforts to reduce GHG emissions, we encourage lawmakers to recognize and build upon the incredible success of the RFS.”
The 600 million metric tons of GHG reduction achieved under the RFS is equivalent to the GHG savings that would result from removing roughly half of the nation’s automobiles from the road for a full year or shutting down 154 coal-fired power plants for a year, according to EPA.
A copy of the study is available here.
Learn more about The Renewable Fuel Association at: https://ethanolrfa.org/

The Environmental Protection Agency says the now-ended government shutdown will not delay rules to allow year-round E15 sales. The EPA intends to finalize the rules in time for the summer driving season.

An EPA official told Reuters, “I still think we can get the rule done in time and what I mean by that is get the rule in place by start of the summertime.” The government shutdown prompted worry that the rule may not be finished in time for the summer driving season. The Renewable Fuels Association this month called similar comments made by Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler encouraging.

However, RFA President and CEO Geoff Cooper says the EPA “would greatly improve its chances of getting the regulatory fix done before summer” if the agency separated the year-round E15 provisions from so-called ‘RIN reform’ provisions also being considered as part of the rulemaking package.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration recently released its Annual Energy Outlook for 2019 report. It’s a federal forecast for anticipated energy needs in the future.

Chris Bliley, vice president of regulatory affairs for Growth Energy, says this report underscores the importance of providing lower-cost options at the fuel pump. “America’s thirst for clean, affordable fuel options is set to remain strong for decades to come,” he says. “Consumers deserve a cleaner, more affordable options, and that’s exactly what higher ethanol blends like E15 can deliver. Regulators at the Environmental Protection Agency must act quickly on the president’s promise and open the door to competition at the fuel pump year-round.”

The new EIA report predicts that “motor gasoline and diesel fuel retail prices will increase by 76 cents per gallon and 82 cents per gallon, respectively, between 2018 and 2050. The jump in fuel prices over that time frame will come because of rising crude oil prices. Additionally, the report also concludes that light-duty vehicle miles traveled will jump by 20 percent, going from 2.9 trillion miles in 2018 to 3.5 trillion in 2050. The rise in miles traveled comes as a result of rising incomes and a growing population.