Tag Archives: Harvest

This is day 13 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Harvest continues to roll through northern Kansas as farmers try to pick up the pace to make up for some lost time. Yields continue to be highly variable throughout the state, with some areas seeing double the county averages, while others are making 25-30 bushels per acre. Pockets of protein continue to be reported in localized areas of the state.

Lynn Moore, a farmer near Pittsburg, finished wheat harvest about two weeks ago. Moore says they had solid yields throughout harvest, and test weights ranged in the upper 50’s.

“It was unexpected for wheat harvest to go as well as it did, but we are just glad it is done and out of the field,” Moore said.

Dell Princ, of Midway Coop Association in Osborne County, reported that they are in the final stages of their wheat harvest this year.

“These are some of the best yields we have seen, considering the year we have had,” Princ said. With solid test weights and proteins ranging from 11-11.5%, Princ is pleased with this year’s harvest.

Chris Tanner, a farmer near Norton, reported that he began his harvest on July 4th (when they normally finish up) but had to press pause for rains until July 12. He is currently about halfway done. He estimates that this year’s county average is in the mid-50s, with some acres seeing upwards of 90 bushels an acre, but others averaging only 25 bushels per acre. Tanner says that fertilized fields are yielding much better, and that proteins in the area are ranging from 10.5-11%. Test weights are 61-63 pounds per bushel. The Syngenta/AgriPro variety Bob Dole is performing very well for Tanner.

“Weather made it difficult to get wheat drilled, and a lot of guys got it in late,” said Tanner. “Spring moisture made it hard to get fertilizer on. Everything has been a fight for us — calving, spraying, planting and overly saturated soils.”

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 9 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Jerald Kemmerer, of Pride Ag Resources in Ford County, says that they are about 80-85% done with wheat harvest this year. With good looking tests weights and sporadic yields, they are still pleased with the wheat that they are cutting. “If mother nature would work with us, we could wrap up harvest this weekend,” says Kemmerer.

John Lightcap, of Offerle Coop Grain & Supply Co in Edwards County, said their wheat harvest is coming to an end for the year as long as the rain stays away. Lightcap says that he is pleased with the protein and test weight numbers that he is seeing in their crop. Harvesting at 3 different locations, they are seeing better protein numbers in northern fields. Being about 93% done with harvest, Lightcap believes that if the weather holds out they should be able to wrap up wheat harvest within the next four to five days.

Frontier Ag Inc. in Graham County is just getting the ball rolling with wheat harvest. Although the area is typically done by now, local farmers are just getting a good start this week. With the wheat that they have cut, they are seeing good test weights and average protein levels. They are hoping to continue on with wheat harvest and its above average yields as the week progresses.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 7 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Rain continued to be hit or miss over the holiday weekend. Many Kansas wheat farmers spent their Independence Day in the wheat field. Some areas in south central Kansas have finally wrapped up their harvest, but there are still a lot of acres left to cut in the rest of the state. While some areas in northwest Kansas have begun, they have been chased out of the fields by scattered storms. Localized rainfall amounts range from zero to more than 8 inches across the state. There is still green wheat in some areas as well.

Josh Debes, who farms near Hoisington, reported that, “with all things considered, late planting, hail damage and weed pressure, we’re pretty happy with this year’s crop.”

While yields are lower than the last couple years, they are in line with the 10 year average. Debes says they are down to their last 30 acres of wheat to cut, but with 2 1/2” of rain Saturday night and more expected Monday night, they won’t be able to finish those up for a few more days. Harvest began June 26, which is much later than normal. Josh and his wife Julia returned to the farm five years ago, and this is the first time they have even cut wheat in July.

Debes reported that test weights are holding up, with even the late planted wheat holding near 60. Even their rust resistant varieties had some rust in them this year, and there were drowned out spots and some late weed pressure. Damage from hail reduced yields in some fields. He said planting date was key; the late planted fields had yield reductions.

Brian Sieker, who farms near Chase, reported that it’s the tail end of harvest in his area. Western Rice County is nearing completion, but he has seen plenty of acres in Barton County that are waiting to be cut. Yields are highly variable, from 25-80 bushels an acre, and test weights are holding steady at 60-63 pounds per bushel. Sieker said that the area has seen damage from hail and flooding. While he doesn’t have exact numbers for his wheat, he has heard neighbors say that there are pockets of protein in the area where they have received a premium.

“We’ve had some good and bad surprises this year,” Sieker said. “But it’s something you just have to take in and learn from for the next year.”

Jason Ochs, who farms near Syracuse, said harvest is going really well this year. Their only problem is that they keep bumping into wet wheat, with some still testing as high as 18% this weekend. Scattered rains and wet ground have delayed harvest. Yields are about double their normal yields in the area, averaging 60-70 bushels per acre this year. Most of the area is about half to two-thirds complete with this year’s harvest. Protein is below average, and Ochs reports his protein is mostly ranging from 10-11%. Test weights for hard red winter wheat are holding up at 60-61, and hard white wheat is even higher at 63+.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

A DTN report says any winter wheat that survived the growing season is likely looking pretty good come harvest time. However, field survival between planting and harvesting could be a little “iffy.”

A delayed harvest is finally getting underway in the Southern Plains.  “It’s been a trying year for producers, especially from April through harvest. It seemed like every night, the potential existed for us to lose the crop,” said Mike Schulte, executive director for the Oklahoma Wheat Commission.

Between the delayed planting and overwhelming amounts of rain, plus the typical spring and summer hailstorms, a lot of wheat fields were either left unplanted or lost altogether.

A Kansas State University Extension Wheat Specialist said the fields that did survive were able to benefit from plenty of soil moisture and below-average temperatures during the grain fill period. The biggest concerns this year was that the crop was so far behind in development during the spring that it was going to catch a lot of the summer heat during grain fill.

The crop has benefited from good weather, featuring near-perfect temperatures that stayed cool even into July.

Kyle Krier, a Kansas farmer, told DTN that the early-planted wheat is doing better than the crop that was late getting into the ground.

This is day 5 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

It’s the tale of two crops during the 2019 Kansas wheat harvest as some pockets of harvested acres are seeing above average yields and test weights while other areas are battling drowned acres, severe lodging, weed pressure and on top of it all, low yields. Combines are continuing to roll northward as some are anxious to start (while others are anxious to finish) before the Fourth of July celebrations.

Jay Armstrong, a farmer in Muscotah, Kansas, has wrapped up his wheat harvest for the year. He ended up averaging about 60 bushels per acre. On acres that weren’t flooded out his test weights came in at around 60 pounds per bushel and higher. A lot of wheat in his area had to be cut wet (thanks to Mother Nature’s soggy conditions) and put in bins with giant fans blowing on the kernels to bring the moisture content down.

Martin Kerschen, a farmer in Garden Plain, Kansas, is finishing up this year’s wheat harvest. They received about 31 inches of rain in a span of 54 days. Nevertheless they were able to pull wheat harvest off. He has been seeing average yields and noticed that the sandier soil fields were harvesting better.

“Considering everything that has happened this year, we are happy with the results,” says Kerschen. Kerschen is also happy for wheat farmers out in western Kansas. He says “while that may not be my field I’m harvesting, all of us wheat farmers are in this together. It’s nice for others in the industry to be successful.”

Jeff Boyd at the Garden City Coop reported their harvest started up late last week and local famers are making progress through the hot and dry days. The proteins are less than average, but their yields have been ranging between 70-80 bushels per acre with an average test weight of 63 pounds per bushel. If the weather holds up, they should have a little over a week left of harvest, so let’s hope Mother Nature keeps the rain away for a while!

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 4 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

According to the USDA/NASS crop progress and condition report for the week ending June 30, only 28% of Kansas winter wheat has been harvested, well behind 68% last year and 61% for the five-year average. Winter wheat condition rated 4 percent very poor, 12 poor, 29 fair, 41 good and 14 excellent. Winter wheat coloring was 98 percent. Mature was 76 percent, behind 95 last year.

Mike Schloctermeier, of Meade Coop Elevator & Supply Co., reports that since starting harvest on June 20, they have seen exceptional results.

“Having dry weather this last week, harvest has really picked up the last 5 or 6 days,” says Schloctermeier. He reported that this is some of the best wheat his guys have seen out in the field, with yields ranging from 65-80. Proteins have been all over the place, ranging from 9 to low 11, but still they are pleased with the results. While they have been running about 10 days behind normal harvest, they are still happy to be harvesting quality wheat this year.

Lyle Friesen with Friesen Harvesting reports that they started harvesting in Oklahoma on June 4 and will continue all the way through harvest in Montana. They have seen yields of 50 to 80 bushels per acre in Kansas, where they are harvesting between Meade and Plains. Test weights have ranged from 60 to 64, and proteins are 10-12%. The area has seen 14 inches of rain since May. While he reports they are harvesting more acres this year than last year, last year was their lowest acres since they started in 1949. The varieties they are harvesting this year are Grainfield and Winterhawk, which have been performing pretty well.

Calvin Williamson, who farms in the Ensign area, reports that his yields are averaging about 80 bushels per acre. He had one field that had hail damage, and with empty heads, it was averaging in the 30s. He reports that a field near Minneola normally yields under 30, but yielded 65 bushels per acre this year. They started harvest on June 26 and plan to be finished with their 2,200 acres by July 6. Test weights have been excellent at 63 pounds, and he reports protein is averaging 12%.

Daren Fischer, of Golden Belt Coop Assn. Inc, in Ellis County, has been seeing the brighter days of wheat harvest this year. Their test weights are excellent, and moisture has been rather solid at 11-12. They are very pleased with the wheat they are seeing. While they did have a few acres hailed out, they are finding the silver lining of the good quality wheat that they are bringing in.

Nicole Harrison, farmer and agronomist with Rezac Land and Livestock in Pottawatomie County, reports that the variety Zenda has been performing well for them this year. Their yields have been ranging from 40 to 60 bushels per acre, which is slightly better than average for their area, especially considering they grazed their wheat. Test weights are ranging from 58-60, and proteins have been excellent, ranging from 11.8 to 13.8%. They started wheat harvest on June 28 and are rushing to get finished so they can bale the straw and get their double crop soybeans planted before July 4.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 3 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Harvest picked up momentum and began to move quickly over the weekend. It has reached many areas across the southern and central parts of the state. With the exception of the northwest, most areas are mature, and only the wet ground is keeping some farmers from the fields.

Doug Keesling, a farmer near Chase, reported that his harvest began on Wednesday. The soil in his area is sandy, so they have been trying to avoid the wet areas, but that’s hard this year. They have already received 25 inches of rain since the beginning of January, and their annual rainfall usually averages 24-26 inches. They don’t have a lot of mud holes, but they found one Sunday and got a combine stuck.

Their fields are yielding in the mid to upper 60 bushels per acre, which is about average. It’s still early in his harvest, which will last a total of about two weeks. Test weights have averaged mostly 58-60, with proteins ranging from 11 to 11.5.

John Hildebrand, a farmer near Stafford, reported that harvest really got started on Thursday, an especially late start for the area. While many acres are ready to cut, he said there is still a decent chunk of acres covered in mud holes and some fields that are too green to harvest. Yields in the area are highly variable, but he estimates that many fields will fall in the 40-70 bushels per acre range. He thinks harvest will be in full swing for another week, providing they continue to have good weather.

Test weights have held up well for Hildebrand, with every truckload he has taken in above 60 pounds per bushel. The one load he has received a protein analysis on came back at 10.8 percent. His fields have also missed several hail events that have severely impacted yields in neighboring communities. He is also dealing with some lodging issues.

“We have been really fortunate to be having yields this good despite bad weather during the growing season and spotty looking stands,” Hildebrand said. “We’ve still got several nice looking fields left to go. We have gotten lucky this year, even with the late start.”

Gary Millershaski, who farms in Kearney County, started his harvest on Friday. He reports that his test weights are up to 65.

“We’ve been very pleasantly surprised with above average yields, heavy test weights and good quality grain,” Millershaski said. He said the yields depend on the variety, but an average yield in his area is 35 to 40 bushels per acre, and his fields have been producing better than that. He said proteins in the area range from 9 to 11.5%. His local elevator, which just added storage capacity, says they’re going to start hauling out on Monday. “I’m afraid we’re going to have storage concerns in the area,” he said.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 1 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Harvest got off to a slow, labored start in south central Kansas over the weekend. The normal excitement and anticipation for wheat harvest can hardly be found in the area, as farmers who are normally finished by late June hop into their combines to face the muddy, dreary conditions for the first time this year. Farmers, who are not typically folks who complain about rain, need some hot, dry weather to really get combines rolling.

According to USDA/NASS for the week ending June 23, winter wheat condition rated 4 percent very poor, 12 poor, 28 fair, 43 good and 13 excellent. Winter wheat coloring was 92 percent, behind 97 last year. Mature was 47 percent, well behind 82 last year. Harvested was 5 percent, well behind 48 last year and 36 for the five-year average.

Mike Snell, manager of the Farmers Coop Equity Co., in Medicine Lodge, reported that his location took in their first load on the 18th, but have only had three dry days since for harvesting. His area, which would have normally finished their harvest this week, is only around five to ten percent harvested. The area received more rain over the weekend which halted progress. It’s too early in the harvest to get a good feel for yields, but test weights (until yesterday) were hanging at about 62 pounds per bushel. Snell estimates the most recent rains may lower that average by about a pound.

Scott Van Allen, a farmer near Clearwater, reported very similar conditions in his area. So far his family, which is normally completely done with harvest at this point, has only harvested around 250 acres. He estimates that with perfect harvesting conditions, he would need around ten days to wrap up. The one field the Van Allens completed yielded in the mid 40 bushels per acre, and he was pleasantly surprised with test weights ranging from 59-61.5 pounds per bushel.

“Everyone’s got bills to pay, and we have neighbors who are still trying to get milo and soybeans in. The jobs are starting to stack up around here,” said Van Allen. “We were fortunate to escape most of the hail over the weekend, but the longer our wheat sits out there, the more vulnerable it is to Mother Nature’s mood swings.”

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — A new government report forecasts an even more bountiful winter wheat harvest in Kansas than had been expected.

The National Agricultural Statistics Service on Tuesday said the state’s crop this year is forecast at 330 million bushels, up 19% from last year. The more optimistic forecast is based on crop conditions on June 1.

The agency is predicting average yields in Kansas of 50 bushels an acre, up 12 bushels from a year ago.

Those extra bushels per acre are bolstering the anticipated harvest in a year when fewer acres overall are anticipated to be harvested. The report says Kansas is expected to harvest 6.6 million acres, down 700,000 acres from last year.