Tag Archives: livestock

MINNEAPOLIS and PARIS/PRNewswire/ — Cargill and InnovaFeed have entered into a strategic partnership to bring sustainable and innovative feed options to the animal nutrition industry. Through the partnership, Cargill and InnovaFeed will collaborate to jointly market fish feed which includes insect protein, enabling both partners to support the growth of sustainable aquaculture.

“We recognize that the planet has finite resources,” said Pilar Cruz, president of Cargill’s compound feed business. “It is our job to find innovative feed options for our customers that protect the planet and support sustainable protein production.”

InnovaFeed’s circular economy approach brings added sustainability benefits as the company uses co-products from the agriculture production of starch and sugar to feed black soldier fly larvae known as Hermetia illucens. Once the larvae reach a certain stage, protein and oil are extracted from the larvae, to be used in feed for pets, aquaculture species and young animals like broilers and piglets.

“By upcycling local cereal co-products and repurposing insect waste as an organic fertilizer, InnovaFeed’s products truly have a positive environmental impact,” said Clement Ray, chief executive officer, InnovaFeed. “We’re also able to have a positive impact on climate change by saving 25,000 tons of CO2 emissions per year with each 10,000-ton-production unit1 by feeding insect meal to animals. That is equivalent to removing 14,000 cars off the roads.”

InnovaFeed’s team of more than 60 engineers and technicians have developed an innovative process allowing them to produce high-quality insect meal at an industrial scale. Over the past three years, InnovaFeed has led multiple trials demonstrating that its insect protein can be an effective alternative to fishmeal used in salmon or shrimp feed with equal or improved performance.

“We’ve seen a strong acceptance of our products by consumers looking for natural and sustainable products,” said Maye Walraven, head of business development for InnovaFeed. Insect-fed trout has been commercialized in France since June of last year.

“This partnership will not only enable our salmon and shrimp customers to differentiate their product lines to meet consumer needs, but we’ll also be responsibly managing resources, enabling both companies to support the growth of sustainable aquaculture and make a positive impact at a global scale,” said Adriano Marcon, president of Cargill’s aqua nutrition business.

“We found the ideal partner in InnovaFeed,” added Helene Ziv, director of risk management and sourcing for Cargill’s animal nutrition business. “We have a shared purpose—offering innovative, sustainable solutions to meet the nutritional needs of our growing population and our customers.”

An invasion of gnats is presenting a risk to the health and lives of livestock in a southern Minnesota town.

The Mankato Free Press reports that gnats cause weight loss and stress for any animal with their bites and by gathering around eyes and in airways.

Brooke Knisley, who runs an organic produce farm with her husband in St. Peter, says one of her friends has lost 16 chickens to the gnats this year. Knisley says she’s trying to reduce the risk for her own flock by running fans in the chicken coop, hanging fly strips and placing vanilla-soaked rags near where the gnats congregate.

Gnats are also an irritant for cattle and horses, and many owners are keeping their animals inside until the invasion passes.

GENEVA, Neb. (AP) — A 30-year-old man has pleaded not guilty to theft and other charges in connection with the discovery of hundreds of dead, ailing or neglected cattle at his farm in southern Nebraska’s Fillmore County.

Court records say Aaron Ogren entered pleas Tuesday to the 40 counts facing him. They include nine counts of prohibited sale of livestock and 30 counts of cruelty to animals. Prosecutors say Ogren sold bulls he didn’t own. A trial date hasn’t been set.

In April local and state officials removed about 200 surviving head of cattle from the feedlot about 3 miles  northwest of Exeter. Another 200 cows were found dead.

When a livestock dealer’s check bounces, should the farmer or rancher who raised the cattle be able to get them back? 

 

USDA wants to hear from the livestock industry regarding potential changes to priority in livestock dealer default situations. The comment period is open through June 24.

 While most people agree producers should be entitled to repossess livestock they sold and have not been paid for, too many sellers have learned the hard way that is not usually allowed under current law. Often times, when a dealer fails to pay, that dealer’s bank takes first priority in the cattle. The Eastern Livestock default in 2010 is the best-known example of this. Eastern owed approximately $112 million to creditors, and many sellers of livestock received less than 5 cents on the dollar from Eastern.

In the 2018 Farm Bill, Congress directed USDA to conduct a feasibility study on Dealer Statutory Trust, which has been proposed by members of congress to improve seller recovery. As a part of the study, USDA is seeking public comments.

A Dealer Trust would give unpaid sellers of livestock first priority to reclaim livestock. If the livestock are resold, to a feedyard for example, the buyer would still take clear title of the livestock as they do today. In this situation, the money the feedyard paid the dealer would be the trust assets held for the unpaid seller.

Modeled after the existing Packer Statutory Trust, a Dealer Trust would provide recovery in addition to the current USDA required bonds, which average a return on claims of only 5-15 cents on the dollar. A Dealer Trust would not create a separate pool of funds or mandate changes in day-to-day business.

LMA supports a Dealer Trust and encourages the whole livestock industry to participate in the USDA comment period. Producers selling through a livestock auction market are paid for their consignments through the market’s federally required custodial account regardless of if the market receives payment from the buyer. When there is a default in these situations, instead of making a small commission for their selling services, the market ends up like the ranchers who sold to the defaulting dealer directly: unpaid for the full price of the cattle.

Other organizations that support Dealer Trust, giving unpaid sellers priority in livestock and related proceeds/receivables, include National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF), United States Cattlemen’s Association (USCA), American Sheep Industry (ASI), and numerous state producer groups.

To learn more, visit https://lmaweb.com/policy/. To submit a comment to USDA by June 24, go to  https://www.regulations.gov/document?D=AMS-FTPP-19-0037-0001.

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue issued the following statement on disaster and trade-related assistance:

“Whether it’s because of natural disasters or unfair retaliatory tariffs, farmers across the country are facing significant challenges and tough decisions on their farms and ranches. Last month, immediately upon China reneging on commitments made during the trade talks, President Trump committed USDA to provide up to $16 billion to support farmers as they absorb some of the negative impact of unjustified retaliation and trade disruption. In addition, President Trump immediately signed into law the long-awaited disaster legislation that provides a lifeline to farmers, ranchers, and producers dealing with extensive damage to their operations caused by natural disasters in 2018 and 2019.

“Given the size and scope of these many disasters, as well as the uncertainty of the final size and scope of this year’s prevented planting acreage, we will use up to $16 billion in support for farmers and the $3 billion in disaster aid to provide as much help as possible to all our affected producers.

“I have been out in the country this spring and visited with many farmers. I know they’re discouraged, and many are facing difficult decisions about what to do this planting season or if they’ve got the capital to stay in business, but they shouldn’t wait for an announcement to make their decisions. I urge farmers to plant for the market and plant what works best on their farm, regardless of what type of assistance programs USDA is able to provide.

“In the coming weeks, USDA will provide information on the Market Facilitation Program payment rates and details of the various components of the disaster relief legislation. USDA is not legally authorized to make Market Facilitation Program payments to producers for acreage that is not planted. However, we are exploring legal flexibilities to provide a minimal per acre market facilitation payment to folks who filed prevent plant and chose to plant an MFP-eligible cover crop, with the potential to be harvested and for subsequent use of those cover crops for forage.”

Background:

For frequently asked questions regarding the USDA Risk Management Agency’s prevented planting policy and losses resulting from floods, please visit, here. For several frequently asked questions regarding how USDA will treat prevented planting acres with regard to the recently announced 2019 Market Facilitation Program and 2018/2019 disaster relief legislation, see below.

1. What is the purpose of the Market Facilitation Program? What is the legal authority?

The Market Facilitation Program (MFP) assists farmers with the additional costs of adjusting to disrupted markets, dealing with surplus commodities, and expanding and developing new markets at home and abroad, consistent with the authorities of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) Charter Act.

2. Last year, soybeans had the highest MFP payment per bushel, should I plant soybeans this year to get the highest payment if I have the opportunity?

You should plant what works best for your operation and what you would plant in any other year, absent any assistance from USDA. 2019 MFP assistance is based on a single county payment rate multiplied by a farm’s total plantings to the MFP-eligible crops (outlined below) in aggregate in 2019. Those per acre payments are not dependent on which of those crops are planted in 2019, and therefore will not distort planting decisions. Your total payment-eligible plantings cannot exceed your total 2018 plantings.

2019 MFP-eligible non-specialty crops: alfalfa hay, barley, canola, corn, crambe, dry peas, extra-long staple cotton, flaxseed, lentils, long grain and medium grain rice, millet, mustard seed, dried beans, oats, peanuts, rapeseed, rye, safflower, sesame seed, small and large chickpeas, sorghum, soybeans, sunflower seed, temperate japonica rice, triticale, upland cotton, and wheat.

2019 MFP-eligible specialty crops: tree nuts, fresh sweet cherries, cranberries, and fresh grapes.

3. My fields never dried out enough to get any crop in, do I get a 2019 Market Facilitation Program payment?

No, USDA does not have the legal authority to make MFP payments to producers for acreage that is not planted. To qualify for a 2019 MFP payment, you must have planted a 2019 MFP-eligible crop. Producers unable to plant their crop should work with their crop insurance agent to file a claim.

4. I filed a prevented planting claim and I am going to plant a cover crop to prevent erosion, does that count for 2019 MFP if it’s on the 2019 MFP-eligible list you announced in May?

If you choose to plant a cover crop with the potential to be harvested, because of this year’s adverse weather conditions, you may qualify for a minimal amount of 2019 MFP assistance. You must still comply with your crop insurance requirements to remain eligible for any indemnities received.

5. I heard that I could get 90% of my crop insurance guarantee as a prevented planting payment through the disaster bill, is that true?

The Additional Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Act of 2019 gives the USDA the authority to compensate losses caused by prevented planting in 2019 up to 90%. While the authority exists, USDA must operate within finite appropriations limits. It is highly unlikely that the supplemental appropriation will support that level of coverage in addition to crop insurance. Congress appropriated $3.005 billion in assistance for a wide array of losses resulting from disasters throughout 2018 and 2019, requiring USDA to prioritize how it is allocated. The Department plans to provide assistance on prevented planting losses within the confines of our authority.

6. If I plant a second crop or cover crop, can I still get my full prevented planting payment? What about an MFP payment?

You must comply with crop insurance requirements to remain eligible for a full prevented planting indemnity. USDA encourages you to visit with your crop insurance agent to ensure you are aware of those various options for your operation. If you choose to plant a cover crop with the potential to be harvested, because of this year’s adverse weather conditions, you may qualify for a minimal amount of 2019 MFP assistance.

7. I have heard that only acreage in a declared disaster area will qualify for prevented planting under the Disaster Relief Act. Is that true?

USDA is currently evaluating the new authority provided under the Additional Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Act of 2019. However, it is generally true that producers with qualifying losses in a Secretarial or Presidentially-declared disaster area will be eligible for Disaster Relief Act assistance. Producers with qualifying losses outside of those areas will have eligibility determined on a case-by-case basis.

8. I have a revenue protection policy with a ‘harvest price option’, do I get the higher of the projected price or harvest price for my prevented planting payment?

The Additional Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Act of 2019 gives the USDA the authority to compensate losses caused by prevented planting in 2019 and also provides additional authority to compensate producers on the higher of the projected price or harvest price. USDA is currently exploring legal flexibility to provide assistance that better utilizes the harvest price in conjunction with revenue and prevent planting policies.

9. If I am prevented from planting but manage to get a cover crop or a forage in the ground, am I able to hay or graze that prior to November 1, given the forage shortage we’re going to experience?

USDA encourages you to visit with your crop insurance agent to ensure you are aware of those various prevented planting, cover crop, and harvest options for your operation. USDA is currently reviewing the prevented planting restrictions in the Federal Crop Insurance Act to determine what options may be available to address this and other issues. Further clarity regarding this haying and grazing date will be forthcoming.

10. What if I don’t have crop insurance? How do MFP and disaster relief programs work for me if I’m prevented from planting due to natural disasters?
Crop insurance is not required to qualify for 2019 MFP assistance. However, USDA requires that a producer plant a 2019 MFP-eligible crop to qualify for the 2019 MFP assistance.

If you choose to plant a cover crop with the potential to be harvested, because of this year’s adverse weather conditions, you may qualify for a minimal amount of 2019 MFP assistance.

The Additional Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Act of 2019 gives the USDA the authority to compensate losses caused by prevented planting in 2019. Producers with qualifying losses in a Secretarial or Presidentially-declared disaster area will be eligible for Disaster Relief Act assistance. Producers with qualifying losses outside of those areas will have eligibility determined on a case-by-case basis.

MANHATTAN, Kan. — Industrial hemp is the new buzzword in Kansas agriculture, but the message is clear: No hemp or hemp-derived products, including CBD oil, are currently approved for use in animal feed, including pet food.

That was the word from Kansas Department of Agriculture officials during a May 23 webinar with K-State Research and Extension agents and specialists.

The Agricultural Improvement Act of 2018, also referred to as the Farm Bill, expanded production opportunities for growing hemp across the country. This year is the first year it’s legal to grow it in Kansas but only within research programs outlined by the Farm Bill.

KDA has developed the Kansas industrial hemp research program, which offers potential for diversification for Kansas farmers looking for an alternative crop or for new farming enterprises, according to Secretary of Agriculture Mike Beam.

“The Kansas agriculture industry is committed to pursuing new and innovative opportunities to grow agriculture,” he said, “and the research generated by participants of this new industrial hemp research program will be valuable data in identifying the growth potential offered in this sector.”

Industrial hemp can be used in various products including paper, biodegradable plastics, and construction materials.

Two agencies regulate feed and feed ingredients in Kansas – the Kansas Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration, said Ken Bowers, feed technical director with the KDA Dairy and Feed Safety Program.

Bowers said feed ingredients used in animal feed in the United States undergo a scientific review by the company that is proposing the ingredient. The company submits the review through one of several avenues for approval, but to date, no hemp or hemp-derived products have been approved. The regulations are designed to keep animals and humans safe.

“That’s the only way to get a legal, approved ingredient,” he said.

The FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine has safety concerns that must be addressed through scientific studies regarding Tetrahydrocannabinol THC and CBD. These concerns and scientific studies have not been addressed yet by industry, Bowers said.

Extension educators around the state have been fielding questions about whether hemp or hemp-derived products can be used as feed ingredients, said Justin Waggoner, beef cattle specialist with K-State Research and Extension and webinar coordinator.

“It’s really important that our stakeholders are knowledgeable on industrial hemp and what can and can’t be done with it in the state of Kansas,” said Dana Ladner, KDA compliance education coordinator, during the webinar.

More information is available on the Kansas Department of Agriculture Industrial Hemp Research Program website and on the K-State Research and Extension Industrial Hemp information page. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute for Food and Agriculture also has a resource page.

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)-The “Food Processing Machinery and Equipment: Global Market Analysis, Trends, and Forecasts” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

This report provides separate comprehensive analytics for the US, Canada, Japan, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and Rest of World. Annual estimates and forecasts are provided for the period 2016 through 2024. Also, a five-year historic analysis is provided for these markets. Market data and analytics are derived from primary and secondary research.

The report analyzes the worldwide markets for Food Processing Machinery and Equipment in US$ Million by the following Product Segments: Meat/Poultry Processing Equipment, Fish/Seafood Processing Equipment, Dry Food Processing Equipment, Beverage Processing Equipment, Pre-Prepared Food Processing Equipment, Dairy Products Processing Equipment, Fruit/Vegetable Processing Equipment, Grain Mill Processing Equipment, Fats & Oil Processing Equipment, and Multi-Products/General Purpose Processing Equipment.

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/l983mz

WASHINGTON- USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) will begin accepting nominations for county committee members on Friday, June 14, 2019. Agricultural producers who participate or cooperate in an FSA program may be nominated for candidacy for the county committee. Individuals may nominate themselves or others as a candidate.

“I encourage America’s farmers, ranchers, and forest stewards to nominate candidates to lead, serve, and represent their community on their county committee,” FSA Administrator Richard Fordyce said. “There’s an increasing need for diverse representation including underserved producers, which includes beginning, women and minority farmers and ranchers.”

Committees make important decisions about how federal farm programs are administered locally. Their input is vital on how FSA carries out disaster programs, as well as conservation, commodity and price support programs, county office employment and other agricultural issues.

Nationwide, more than 7,700 dedicated members of the agricultural community serving on FSA county committees. The committees are made of three to 11 members and typically meet once a month. Members serve three-year terms. Producers serving on our FSA county committees play a critical role in the day-to-day operations of the agency.

Producers should visit their local FSA office today to find out how to get involved in their county’s election. Check with your local USDA service center to see if your local administrative area is up for election this year. Organizations, including those representing beginning, women and minority producers, also may nominate candidates.

To be considered, a producer must sign an FSA-669A nomination form. The form and other information about FSA county committee elections are available at fsa.usda.gov/elections. All nomination forms for the 2019 election must be postmarked or received in the local FSA office by Aug. 1, 2019.

Election ballots will be mailed to eligible voters beginning Nov. 4, 2019. Read more to learn about important election dates.