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Audio: KAAPA Ethanol Crop Progress Report For The Week Of June 1

Audio: KAAPA Ethanol Crop Progress Report For The Week Of June 1

As the heat of June starts to roll in planting is essentially done in several states and emergence continues well ahead of the five year average. With planting and emergence looking solid the first corn and soybean condition reports are also strong. Winter wheat continues to head out in the warm weather. Harvest is just getting started in Southern states like Texas. Pasture and range condition is mixed on the high plains with some states dropping and other picking up due to recent weather patterns. Topsoil moisture across the board looks to drop week to week. While subsoil moisture stays unchanged to slightly better week to week.

We start in the corn planting with the nation now 93% complete. That is 4% ahead of the five year average. So the basis between the five year and this year has quickly narrowed at the end of planting season. Nebraska is now staring across the finish line of corn planting at 99%. That is 5% ahead of the five year average. Kansas is also nearing the finish line at 92% planted. 4% ahead of the five year average. North Dakota jumped 21% week to week in corn planting, but is still just 75% complete. 15% behind it’s five year average.

With high pressure and warm air building across the plains emergence is strong for corn and soybeans. Nationally corn emergence is rated at 78%. 5% ahead of the five year average. Nebraska corn is 88% emerged. 9% ahead of the five year average. Kansas is 74% emerged just 1% ahead of the five year average. While North Dakota really jumped week to week in planting emergence is still sluggish at 26% almost half of the five year average at 57%.

The second week of corn condition ratings showed an improvement of 4% nationally to 74% good to excellent. Nebraska remained unchanged at 82% good to excellent. Kansas corn improved 4% to 67% good to excellent.

Switching from corn to soybeans. Soybean planting nationally is now rated 75% complete ahead of the five year average of 68%. Nebraska has just 5% of it’s soybean acres left to plant (95% planted). That is well ahead of the five year average of 78%. Kansas has planted 62% of it’s soybean crop. That will make Kansas 18% ahead of their five year average for soybean planting. Iowa also continues to roll on soybean planting with 95% of their soybeans planted. 20% ahead of the five year average.

Soybean emergence is also strong in the warming trend of June. Nationally 52% of soybeans have emerged. That compares to the five year average of 44%. Nebraska has seen 73% of it’s soybean acres emerge. That almost doubles the Nebraska five year average of 47%. Kansas has stayed 20% ahead of it’s five year average with 46% of Kansas soybeans now emerged. Finally Iowa is currently at 78% soybean emergence. Well ahead of the five year average of 48%.

June 1 marks the first soybean condition rating. The nation is starting off strong at 70% good to excellent. Nebraska is better at 82% good to excellent. Kansas is currently 68% good to excellent. Iowa has one of the best soybean crops in the nation at 81% good to excellent.

From the corn belt we head to the winter wheat belt. Winter wheat continues to head out just  behind the five year average pace. Nationally 77% of the winter wheat crop has  headed out. That is 6% behind the five year average. Kansas currently sits at 94% headed out almost with it’s five year average of 96%. Nebraska is well away from it’s five year average with only 41% of the winter wheat crop headed out. Nebraska is typically closer to 61% headed out this time of year.

With states like Texas already 100% headed out, combines are starting to roll. Nationally 3% of the winter wheat crop has been harvested. That is 1% ahead of the five year average. Nebraska and Kansas have yet to officially start harvest. Texas is ahead of schedule with 32% of the winter wheat already cut. That is 11% ahead of the five year average for Texas winter wheat harvest.

Winter wheat quality dropped 3% nationally this week to 51% good to excellent. Nebraska dropped 6% at 64% good to excellent. Kansas increased 2% to 42% good to excellent. Colorado still struggles with it’s winter wheat quality. Only 31% of the crop is rated good to excellent. 28% is rated fair, 21% poor and 20% very poor.M

Moving over to pasture and range condition. Nebraska range decreased 4% in quality week to week to 78% good to excellent. Kansas increased 2% in range quality at 58% good to excellent.

Topsoil moisture is quickly evaporating as rain clouds get replaced with blue skies and sunshine. Nebraska top soil moisture for the week of June 1 is rated at 89% adequate to surplus. Down 2% week to week. Kasnas topsoil moisture is rated at 75% adequate to surplus. Also down 2% week to week. Subsoil moisture for Nebraska will remain unchanged week to week at 89% adequate to surplus. Kansas subsoil moisture will increase 1% to 77% adequate to surplus.

You can see the entire crop progress report here: https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/m039kr87h/4j03dk14k/prog2320.pdf

Clay Patton recaps the latest crop progress numberes:

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