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KAPPA Ethanol crop progress report for the week of October 11

KAPPA Ethanol crop progress report for the week of October 11

As expected in the October 11 crop progress report, harvest is racing ahead with dry weather across much of the country. The dry though is hindering emergence of winter wheat and quickly depleting topsoil and subsoil moisture.

Row crops have essentially hit the final stages of maturity with corn maturity reaching a national rating of 94%, 7% ahead of the five year average. Soybean dropping leaves is now rated 93% nationwide, 3% ahead of the five year average.

As for harvest national corn harvest jumped from 25% complete last week to 41% complete this week. That is 9% ahead of the five year average. In the state by state break down Nebraska has harvested 34% of the state’s corn and Kansas has harvested 63% of the states corn. Both jumped 10+% week to week and are well ahead of the five year average. Big I-states are quickly approaching the halfway mark on corn harvest with Illinois at 45%, Indiana 34%, and Iowa 42% corn harvested. Soybean harvest nationwide is 61% complete, 19% ahead of the five year average and up 23% from last week. Nebraska has harvested 82% of the state’s soybean crop. That more than doubles the five year average of 39% and almost quadruples year ago harvest levels which were just 24%. Kansas soybean harvest is 40% complete. That perfectly doubles the five year average. Big I-states soybean harvest continues to roll on with Illinois 56%, Indiana 52% and Iowa 78% complete. Finally sorghum harvest is keeping just ahead of the five year harvest with 49% of the national harvest complete. Nebraska has harvested 31% of the states sorghum. That is 8% ahead of the five year average.

Crop conditions deteriorated on the national scale this week with key states seeing a decent drop. Nationally corn is rated 61% good to excellent, down 1% from last week. Nebraska corn increased 2% week to week to 63% good to excellent. Kansas corn is unchanged week to week at 54% good to excellent. Iowa corn dropped 1% to 44% good to excellent. Illinois corn though saw an 8% drop to 68% good to excellent. The national soybean condition dropped 1% as well to 63% good to excellent. Nebraska soybeans were unchanged week to week at 63% good to excellent. Kansas soybeans increased 3% to 56% good to excellent. Iowa soybeans were unchanged week to week at 49% good to excellent. Illinois soybeans fell 9% to 66% good to excellent. Nationally sorghum dropped 1% to 50% good to excellent. Nebraska sorghum improved 8% to 68% good to excellent.

Winter wheat planting could possibly be finished in the next two weeks with the current pace being  set. Nationally 68% of the winter wheat crop is planted, 7% ahead of the five year average and up 16% from last week. In the state by state break down Colorado has the most winter wheat planted at 94%. Followed by Nebraska at 89%. South Dakota at 88% and Kansas was further away at 74% planted.

Dry conditions are slowing Nebraska winter wheat emergence, but nationwide 41% of the crop has emerged. That is 6% ahead of the five year average. Kansas has 50% of the winter wheat crop emerged, up 18% from the five year average. Nebraska has 60% of the winter wheat crop emerged, down 8% from the five year average.

Pasture and range conditions continue to drop week to week. Nebraska range dropped 2% to 36% good to excellent. Kansas pasture dropped 6% yo 32% good to excellent. Wyoming has some of the poorest range in the Midwest with only 1% being rated good and 0% excellent. Wyoming has 70% of the pasture and range rated poor to very poor.

Topsoil moisture in Kansas has taken large drops the last couple of weeks. Dropping 10% to 28% adequate to surplus this week. That is 23% drop in the last two weeks. Nebraska topsoil dropped 6% this week to 27% adequate to surplus. Dropping 13% over the last two weeks. Subsoil moisture in Kansas dropped 8% to 39% adequate to surplus. Nebraska subsoil dropped 4% to 34% adequate to surplus.

You can view the full report here:

https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/hd76sq359/pg15c454g/prog4220.pdf

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