Tag Archives: agriculture

Grand Island, Nebr. – The Rural Radio Network is excited to announce their “Women in Agriculture” series. Recent USDA data shows that thirty-one percent (31%) of American farmers are women. We are looking for nominations for this series set to begin January 2020.

Each week we will highlight women from across the state and nation and the unique role they play in agriculture and the diversity within that role.

Nominations can include women from an array of agricultural backgrounds from production, to agribusiness, to leading within organizations.

If you know a woman who deserves to be recognized for efforts within the agriculture industry you can nominate her here.

Nominations are being accepted through December 31st.

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LINCOLN, NEB. – “Japan’s passage of the new limited trade agreement with the U.S. is a big deal for Nebraska farm and ranch families. As the nation’s leading exporter of beef, and Japan being our largest customer, Nebraska stands to make significant gains from the agreement.

This deal will put tariff reductions on Nebraska beef on par with our international competitors. According to Nebraska Farm Bureau estimates based on USDA data, Nebraska exported more than $253 million of beef to Japan in 2017. The reduction of tariffs from nearly 40 percent down to 9 percent when the agreement is fully implemented, will likely cause that number to grow.

This agreement is also about more than beef. Japan is a leading importer of Nebraska corn, pork, wheat, poultry, ethanol, and dairy products; all of which will see a significant or complete reduction in tariffs under the new agreement. Between 2015-2017, Nebraska exported roughly $550 million in agricultural products per year to Japan. Given our experience with tariff reductions, we fully expect that dollar amount to increase.”

“We thank President Trump and his trade team for their work to get this agreement across the finish line. We also thank Nebraska’s Congressional Delegation for providing the necessary push to the administration, which helped us get to this point. However, while we can celebrate this win, a lot more work must be done to reduce the uncertainty of our international trade situation. Today, we renew our call to Congress to pass President Trump’s US – Mexico – Canada Agreement (USMCA). With the agreement sitting on Congress’ To-Do list for more than a year, we urge Speaker Pelosi to bring the agreement up for a vote before the end of 2019. Lastly, President Trump must also work to finalize an agreement with China. Nebraska farmers and ranchers have patiently waited while the administration has worked to right the many wrongs that exist with the U.S./China trade relationship. While we know not everything will be solved overnight, we hope a proposed multi-phased approach starting with agriculture will be finalized before the end of the year.”

In a flurry of meeting with reporters Tuesday in London, President Donald Trump says he has no deadline for finalizing a complete trade deal with China.

China and the U.S. are still working to reach a phase one agreement, with an unofficial deadline of December 15, but an overall agreement may extend beyond the 2020 elections. Trump told reporters, “In some ways, I think it’s better to wait until after the election.”

Trump says China wants to reach an agreement, adding, “the China trade deal is dependent on one thing: Do I want to make it?” Trump claims he is doing “very well” in the talks with China. The President also pointed out the $28 billion in trade aid given to U.S. farmers, with “many billions” leftover, adding about the funds, “that got them whole.”

China wants Trump to remove tariffs in reaching a phase one agreement that also includes $40-$50 billion in purchases of U.S. agricultural products over two years.

WASHINGTON, Dec. 2, 2019 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Office of Partnerships and Public Engagement (OPPE) today announced fellowship opportunities to connect USDA resources with faculty and staff at Hispanic Serving Institutions, 1994 Tribal Colleges and Universities, and 1890 Land-Grant Universities.

 

“We are excited to build upon the more than 20 years of success of the E. Kika De La Garza Fellowship Program to offer additional opportunities to empower faculty and staff from our partner institutions to holistically develop the next generation of agriculture,” said OPPE Director Mike Beatty.

 

The purpose of these fellowships is to connect participants to USDA and other federal resources while focusing on student development. Fellows will receive access to long-term collaboration opportunities, and then share what they learned with students and colleagues at their home institutions.

 

The E. Kika De La Garza Fellowship Program is designed for faculty or staff at a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) or Hispanic-Serving School District. HSIs are accredited colleges and universities with at least 25 percent Hispanic student enrollment. Currently, there are more than 500 HSIs in 21 states and Puerto Rico, serving more than 2 million students. See the 2020 the E. Kika De La Garza Fellowship Program application (PDF, 1.2 MB) for details.

 

The Terra Preta do Indio Tribal Fellowship is designed for faculty and staff from 1994 Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs) and Secondary Education Superintendents, Principals, Agricultural and/or District Level Teachers working for Bureau of Indian Education designated high schools. See the Terra Preta do Indio Tribal Fellowship application (PDF, 257 KB) for details.

 

The Booker T. Washington Fellowship is aimed at faculty and staff at an accredited 1890 Land-Grant University and Secondary Education Superintendents, Principals, Agricultural and/or District Level Teachers working for an 1890 Land-Grant University feeder high school. See the 2020 Booker T. Washington Fellowship application (PDF, 349 KB) for details.

 

Each program offers opportunities for Education Fellows and Science Fellows. Education Fellows participate in a week-long program in Washington, D.C. scheduled to start June 15 and end on June 19, 2020. Science Fellows participate in a two-week program, consisting of one week in Washington, D.C. and a second week at a USDA research location, ending on June 26, 2020.

 

The application deadline for all fellowship opportunities is 11:59 p.m. on February 12, 2020.

 

On Nov. 28, the European Parliament voted to approve a plan granting the United States a country-specific share of the European Union’s duty-free high-quality beef quota. The agreement, which was signed and announced in August, is detailed in this press release from the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR).

U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) President and CEO Dan Halstrom issued the following statement:

Approval by the European Parliament keeps this agreement on track for implementation in early 2020, which is outstanding news for the U.S. beef industry and our customers in Europe. Lack of capacity in the duty-free quota has been a source of frustration on both sides of the Atlantic, and a U.S.-specific share of the quota will help ensure that U.S. beef can enter the European market 52 weeks per year, without delay or interruption.

The European Union is one of the highest value destinations in the world for U.S. beef, and consistent access will not only benefit U.S. producers and exporters, but also European importers and their clientele. USMEF thanks USTR and USDA for negotiating this agreement and securing its approval, which will bolster the U.S. industry’s efforts to expand the European customer base for U.S. beef.

LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — Panelists at a discussion in Lincoln will cover strategies for increasing agricultural production to meet global demand.

The discussion is part of the Heuermann Lecture series sponsored by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources. It is scheduled to begin at 3:30 p.m. on Nov. 25 at the Nebraska Innovation Campus Conference Center, 2021 Transformation Drive.

The discussion will be followed by a showing of a documentary film, “Follow the Water.”

Experts say ag production must increase more than 70% by 2050 to meet the worldwide demand for food, fuel, feed and fiber.

Hip hip, hooray! It’s the American Farm Bureau’s 100th birthday!

Join Alex and Rebel on this week’s edition of Friday Five, as they discuss trade with China, a major hit to the dairy industry, and more. 

 

Stories:

5- Farm Bureau turns 100

4- The Scoop on Ben & Jerry’s 

3- China Hog Herd: Five Year to Bounce Back 

2- China Lifts Five-Year Ban on U.S. Poultry

1- Largest Milk Producer Files Bankruptcy 

 

 

The 2018 Irrigation and Water Management Survey results are out this week, showing that over 231,400 farms irrigated 55.9 million acres. That included 83.4 million acre-feet of water in the United States.

By way of comparison, the 2013 survey showed there were just over 229,230 farms that irrigated 55.3 million acres, which included 88.5 million acre-feet of water. The results show that even though the number of farms irrigating, and the amount of land increased slightly over those five years, the total amount of water used to irrigate land actually declined.

The 83.4 million acre-feet of water used to irrigate land in 2018 represent a 5.8 percent drop from 2013. The average acre-feet applied to land was 1.5, which is lower than the 1.6 in 2013. An acre-foot is the amount of water required to cover one acre to a depth of one foot.

The largest portion of irrigated farmland acres in the U.S. was dedicated to cropland, including grains and oilseeds, vegetables, nurseries, greenhouses, as well as hay crops. The survey also shows that more acres are irrigated with sprinkler systems than with gravity irrigation.

Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue is hoping that a third round of trade aid payments to farmers will be unnecessary in 2020 because of a new trade deal with China.

The Hagstrom Report says Perdue spoke with reporters last week shortly after returning from a “successful” trade mission to Mexico. Farmers “would rather have trade than aid,” Perdue says. At the same time, he did say the second round of 2019 trade aid is approved and will be heading to farmers soon. “We have just gotten authorization on the second tranche,” he said. “I expect payments to be out to farmers by late November or early December.” The U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement was one of the big topics of conversation on the trip to Mexico.

Perdue says Mexican officials are hoping Congress will sign off on the agreement as soon as possible. “They’ve done their work, as you know, and they’re anxious for us to complete our task as well,” Perdue says. Immigration was another topic of conversation with Mexican officials. Perdue is hopeful that the Mexican government will begin a program to “pre-certify” workers southeast Mexico for the H-2A Program. Southeast Mexico is one of the most poverty-stricken areas of the country.

The October Ag Economy Barometer improved to a reading of 136 in October, up 15 points compared to September. The monthly measure of the farm economy saw an increase in the assessment of current and future conditions by farmers.

The Current Conditions Index rose from 100 in September to 115 in October, and the Futures Expectations Index also rose 15 points to a reading of 146. The results are based upon a nationwide telephone survey of 400 U.S. crop and livestock producers. Organizers say farmers in October were more inclined to think now is a good time to make large investments in their farming operations, and more farmers said they expect farmland values to rise, than in September.

Although three-fourths of farmers in this month’s survey said they expect the soybean trade dispute with China to be resolved favorably to U.S. agriculture, 62 percent of producers said they expect to receive another round of trade aid payments for the 2020 crop year.