Tag Archives: crops

LINCOLN, Neb. (January 19, 2021) – Longtime educator in Saunders County has had an accomplished, award winning career. University of Nebraska–Lincoln faculty member and Extension Educator Keith Glewen is retiring after 40 years with Nebraska Extension.

Working for Saunders County Extension out of the Eastern Nebraska Research Center (ENREC), Keith had a long and decorated career helping Nebraska’s growers, specifically with innovative cropping and water systems. Keith rose to have regional and statewide responsibilities for agronomic issues related to natural resources and the environment. His emphases were in agricultural profitability, on-farm research and soil and water management stewardship. He also spent considerable time developing programs for industry consultants who support farmers across the Midwest.

“We want to thank Keith Glewen for many years of service to Nebraska farmers,” said Eugene Goering, chairman of the Nebraska Soybean Board. “We want to especially thank him for his excellent work on the Soybean Management Field Days program. We wish Keith the best in his future plans.”

With faculty and stakeholders, Keith successfully developed the Crop Management and Diagnostic Clinic at ENREC. Field-based training sessions offered during the growing season help crop consultants and industry agronomists with diagnostic training to improve the use of row crop production best practices. In 2019, 240 participants representing 36 Nebraska counties and six states estimated the value of this training to be $28.7 million dollars.

Keith has worked with commodity boards to further research and Extension efforts through programs such as Soybean Management Field Days, Irrigation and Energy Management Field Day, Nebraska Soybean Day & Machinery Expo, Nebraska Cover Crop – Soil Health Conference, and the Nebraska On-Farm Research Network.  He has spent his career establishing trusted relationships with commodity boards, industry representatives, organizations, and growers and has helped numerous growers and producers improve and enhance their operations.

He was a member of several national, regional and local professional organizations, including the American Society of Agronomy, Nebraska Soybean Association, Soil Science Society of America and USDA Saunders County Food and Agriculture Council. Keith was also often recognized for his excellence as an educator and leader, winning several awards—in 2018, the Lower Platte North Natural Resources District named him its Water Cooperator of the Year.

The Nebraska Soybean Board (NSB) wants to thank Keith for his tireless work in supporting Nebraska’s farmers and for being an excellent and distinguished partner for the NSB.

USDA today released its January Crop Production, World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE), Quarterly Stocks and Winter Wheat Seedings reports.

WHEAT: The outlook for 2020/21 U.S. wheat this month is for stable supplies, higher domestic use, unchanged exports, and lower ending stocks. Feed and residual use is raised 25 million bushels to 125 million on lower-than-expected second-quarter stocks reported in today’s NASS Grain Stocks report. Seed use is up 1 million bushels to 63 million, reflecting 2020/21 wheat planted area released today in the NASS Winter Wheat and Canola Seedings report. Projected 2020/21 ending stocks are reduced 26 million bushels to 836 million, down 19 percent from last year. The season-average farm price is raised $0.15 per bushel to $4.85 based on NASS prices reported to date and expectations for futures and cash prices
for the remainder of the marketing year.

The 2020/21 global wheat outlook is for smaller supplies, increased consumption, higher exports, and reduced stocks. Supplies are lowered 1.6 million tons to 1,072.7 million on reduced production in China and Argentina more than offsetting an increase for Russia.

Corn sent to limit gains following USDA data drop Tuesday | Jeff Peterson – Heartland Farm Partners

China’s production is reduced 1.8 million tons to 134.3 million on the National Bureau of Statistics estimate. Russia’s production is raised 1.3 million tons to a new record of 85.3 million, based on estimates from Russia’s statistical agency Rosstat, surpassing the 2017/18 crop. Argentina’s production is reduced 0.5 million tons to 17.5 million on updated harvest results to date and this would be Argentina’s smallest crop in five years. World 2020/21 consumption is increased 1.8 million tons to 759.5 million, mostly on higher feed and residual use for China and the United States and greater food, seed, and industrial (FSI) use for Russia. Continued high domestic corn prices in China are expected to result in further wheat feed use as projected 2020/21 wheat feed consumption is raised 1.0 million tons to 25.0 million, up 32 percent from last year. Russia’s FSI consumption is raised 500,000 tons to 23.5 million with greater supplies.

COARSE GRAINS: This month’s 2020/21 U.S. corn outlook is for lower production, reduced corn used for ethanol, smaller feed and residual use and exports, and decreased ending  stocks. Corn production is estimated at 14.182 billion bushels, down 324 million on a lower yield and slight reduction in harvested area.

Total corn use is down 250 million bushels to 14.575 billion. Exports are down 100 million bushels, reflecting sharply lower supplies and higher expected prices. Corn used for ethanol is lowered, based on data through November from the Grain Crushings and Co-Products Production report and weekly ethanol production during December as indicated by the Energy Information Administration. Feed and residual use is reduced 50 million bushels to 5.650 billion, based on indicated disappearance during the September-November quarter. With supply falling more than use, corn stocks are lowered 150 million bushels to 1.552 billion. The season-average corn price received by producers is raised to $4.20 per bushel.

Sorghum production is estimated 2 million bushels higher as increased harvested area more than offsets a reduction in yield. Food, seed, and industrial use is lowered 10 million bushels on lower sorghum used for ethanol. Exports are raised 15 million bushels reflecting larger exports to China.

Global coarse grain production for 2020/21 is forecast down 9.3 million tons to 1,438.5 million. This month’s foreign coarse grain outlook is for lower production and consumption, and smaller ending stocks. Foreign corn production is reduced with declines for Argentina and Brazil more than offsetting increases for China and India. For Argentina, dryness during December reduces yield prospects for early-planted corn in key central growing areas. Brazil is lowered reflecting reduced yield expectations for first-crop corn in southern Brazil.

OILSEEDS: U.S. oilseed production for 2020/21 is estimated at 122.4 million tons, down 1.25 million from the previous report. Smaller soybean, peanut, and cottonseed crops are partly offset by an increase for canola and sunflower seed. Soybean production is estimated at 4.135 billion bushels, down 35 million led by reductions for Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas. Harvested area is estimated at 82.3 million acres, up slightly from the previous report. Yield is estimated at 50.2 bushels per acre, down 0.5 bushels. With higher imports and slightly higher beginning stocks, soybean supplies are down 14 million bushels from last month.

The soybean crush forecast is raised 5 million bushels to 2.2 billion, reflecting improved prospects for soybean meal exports with a lower export forecast for Argentina. The soybean export forecast is raised 30 million to a record 2.23 billion bushels. With lower supplies and increased use, ending stocks are projected at 140 million bushels, down 35 million from the previous forecast.

Soybean and soybean product prices are forecast higher this month. The U.S. seasonal average soybean price for 2020/21 is projected at $11.15 per bushel, up 60 cents as cash prices in Central Illinois reach 6-year highs. The soybean meal price is projected at $390 per short ton, up 20 dollars. The soybean oil price is forecast at 38.5 cents per pound, up 2.5 cents.

Foreign 2020/21 oilseed production is relatively unchanged, with higher sunflower seed mostly offset by lower soybean, cottonseed, peanut, rapeseed, and palm kernel output. Sunflower seed production is increased 0.5 million tons to 13.5 million for Russia based on recent government estimates. Soybean production is lowered 2 million tons to 48 million for Argentina and 0.2 million to 2.2 million for Uruguay, reflecting dry weather conditions in December and early January. Mostly offsetting lower South American soybean production is a 2.1-million-ton increase to 19.6 million for China on recent government data. Global soybean stocks are lowered 1.3 million tons to 84.3 million, with lower stocks for Argentina and the United States that are partly offset by higher stocks for China.

LIVESTOCK, POULTRY, AND DAIRY: The 2020 total red meat and poultry production estimate is reduced from last month. The beef production estimate is reduced on lower cattle slaughter. The pork production estimate is reduced as the slower pace of slaughter in late 2020 more than offset heavier carcass weights. The broiler production estimate is reduced on recent hatchery and slaughter data, while the turkey production estimate is lowered or recent production data. The egg production estimate is unchanged.

For 2021, the total red meat and poultry production forecast is lowered from the previous month as lower expected beef, broiler, and turkey production more than offsets higher pork production. Lower expected placements in late 2020 will impact fed cattle supplies in mid2021. Cattle carcass weights are forecast lighter for 2021. USDA will release its semiannual Cattle report on January 29, providing estimates of heifers held for breeding and an insight into the number of feeder cattle available for placement during 2021.

The pork production forecast for 2021 is raised from the previous month as higher expected hog slaughter more than offsets lighter expected carcass weights. Broiler, turkey, and egg production forecasts are lowered for 2021 as higher feed costs are expected to slow production growth.

The beef import estimate for 2020 is reduced on recent trade data while the 2021 import forecast is reduced primarily due to lower expected imports from Australia. Beef exports for 2020 and 2021 are raised from last month. Pork exports for 2020 and 2021 are lowered from last month on weaker import demand from key trading partners. The 2020 broiler export estimate is raised on recent trade data, but no change is made to the 2021 export forecast.

Livestock and poultry price estimates for 2020 are adjusted to reflect December price data. For 2021, cattle prices are raised on a lower production forecast. The 2021 hog price forecast is raised, reflecting strong domestic demand. Broiler prices are raised as lower forecast production in the second half of the year is expected to support firmer prices.

Mike Zuzolo breaks the report down here:

China imported a record amount of corn in November, giving rise to optimism that prices may be getting into their longest rally since 1988.

Pro Farmer says China bought 12 times more corn last month than in 2019. Customs data shows that for the first 11 months of 2020, imports more than doubled to nine million tons, passing China’s World Trade Organization commitments of 7.2 million tons for the first time in history.

The surge in corn imports pushed the overall Chinese grain prices higher. An official with the Chinese ag ministry says the Southeast Asian country has boosted imports of other feed grains like barley and DDGs to help narrow the supply gap. Higher prices are likely to give farmers the incentive to increase their corn planting next year, ensuring farmers have basic self-sufficiency.

China imported 1.3 million tons of corn in November, up 1,130 percent from November of 2019, while imports for the year totaled 9.04 million tons through November, up 122.7 percent from the same time last year.