Tag Archives: crops

The Illinois Department of Agriculture recently announced additional label restrictions for the 2020 growing season for dicamba. Agriculture Director John Sullivan announced the rules due to a dramatic rise in the number of off-target complaints received during the 2019 growing season, adding “the department is taking action to reduce those numbers.”

The new restrictions halt the use of dicamba after June 20, 2020. The new regulations also prohibit the application of dicamba if the air temperature at the field at the time of application is over 85 degrees Fahrenheit, or if the National Weather Service’s forecasted high temperature for the nearest available location for the day of application exceeds 85 degrees.

Applicators also must maintain the label-specified downwind buffer between the last treated row and the nearest downfield edge of any Illinois Nature Preserves Commission site. In addition to these provisions’, applicators must follow the federal guidelines when it comes to applying dicamba, including taking an annual certified applicator training course.

WICHITA, Kan. — Registration is now open for the 24th annual No-till on the Plains Winter Conference. Online registration is open for growers, industry partners and soil health enthusiasts to attend the popular soil health expo and educational event. The Conference will take place January 28-29, 2020 at the Hyatt Regency and Century II Convention Center, Wichita, Kan. This annual event offers great networking opportunities for attendees, and Wichita offers ample entertainment and dining options. Registration is available at www.notill.org

In its 24th year, the Conference continues to offer international, national and state experts focused on improved soil health systems for increased farm profit. The 2019 Winter Conference features a line-up of farmers, soil health researchers and conservation professionals aiming to share their expertise and knowledge with attendees.

Registration for the No-till on the Plains Conference is available now online at notill.org. The Winter Conference registration price is $275. Walk-ins are welcome but rates increase closer to the event date. Registration rates are also available in packages for those who want to attend the Fundamentals of Soil Health Workshop and the Winter Conference together, or the Winter Conference and Advanced Concepts in Soil Health Symposium in tandem. Discounted rooms rates are available at the Hyatt Regency Hotel

This year’s speaker lineup features physician, author and lecturer Dr. Daphne Miller, Dr. Miller is the author of Farmacology, Total Health from the Ground Upan eloquent call for better systems of sustainable agriculture and humanistic health care. In linking the two, Dr. Miller brings a physician’s critical eye account of what she learned about taking care of patients from visits to farmers who view growing food as part of a self-sustaining, integrated, natural cycle.

The diverse lineup of speakers this year also includes: Brendon Rockey, producer from Colorado; Ian and Diane Haggerty, producers from Australia; John Kempf, innovative soil and plant health consultant from Ohio, Jason Mauck, producer from Indiana; Doug Peterson, USDA soil health specialist from Missouri, and Steve Groff, cover crop and industrial hemp expert from Pennsylvania.

Attendees have several options to attend additional soil health workshops before and after the Conference. On Monday January 27th, An introductory level event, Fundamentals of Soil Health, is being offered for individuals looking for the basics of getting started with no-till and improved soil health. Also on the 27th is an offering of more advanced information. Advanced Concepts in Soil Health, The Above and Below, features John Kempf and Michael Phillips presenting on plant health, nutrient optimization, fungal connections in the soil and building a soil network. Certified Crop Advisor Credits will also be available for conference attendees.

Sponsors for the 2020 Winter Conference are: Green Cover Seed, Farmers Business Network, General Mills Exapta Solutions, The NoRegrets Initiative and the Ceres Trust. All of these generous sponsors will be available to attendees throughout the Conference.

Visit notill.org or call (785) 210-4549 for registration information. Pre-registration online is encouraged.

Much of Washington, D.C., is consumed with questions about Ukraine and the impeachment inquiry. However, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell publicly scolded Democrats’ handling of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement. Politico says McConnell wants House Democrats to pass the North American trade agreement, noting that “the time for excuses is over.”

Speaking on the Senate floor, McConnell said Democrats continued objections to the new pact are nothing more than “heel-dragging.” He says the delay is because of the House impeachment inquiry and related investigations. “Canada, Mexico, and millions of Americans are waiting for Speaker Pelosi to remember that serving the public interest requires more than just picking fights with the President,” McConnell says.

His comments come after House Democrats pledged last week that the newly-launched impeachment inquiry will not affect their ability to work with the administration to negotiate changes in four key areas of the agreement with our North American trade partners. Those areas include labor, the environment, access to medicines, and enforcement.

The Organic Trade Association this week announced the development of three online training courses to bolster its Organic Fraud Prevention Solutions program. The training courses are designed for organic businesses, accredited certifiers and organic inspectors, with one of the courses a pre-requisite for businesses pre-enrolled in the program.

The Organic Fraud Prevention Solutions program was launched by the Organic Trade Association earlier this year, and almost four dozen organic businesses have joined. The new anti-fraud courses will analyze where opportunities for crime in the organic supply chain most commonly occur, and offers education on the Organic Fraud Prevention Plan and how to put it into real on-the-job practice.

A spokesperson for the Organic Trade Association says the effort “will strengthen our ability to protect against fraud and maintain the integrity of organic.” The three online courses will be available in late 2019 and early 2020. Enrollment and program information is available on the association’s website, OTA.com.

The Kansas State University recently released three new wheat varieties, which are available to Certified seed growers this fall and will be available to farmers in fall 2020.
The new releases include two hard red winter wheat varieties – KS Western Star and KS Dallas – and one hard white wheat, KS Silverado. They were all developed at the K-State Agricultural Research Center in Hays, Kan. The wheat breeding program at Kansas State University, with locations in Manhattan and Hays, receives funding from the Kansas Wheat Commission through the two-cent wheat checkoff.

Thanks to wheat breeding programs like the one at K-State, producers have ever-improving options of wheat varieties to plant. Whether it’s improved resistance or increased yields, wheat breeders are creating varieties that meet producers’ changing needs.

KS Western Star

KS Western Star was named after the Western Star Milling Company in Salina, Kan. It is adapted to central and western Kansas, eastern Colorado, northwest Oklahoma and southwest Nebraska.

KS Western Star is a medium maturity and medium tall statured variety. It had greater yields than any other hard red winter wheat varieties in the KIN tests in 2017 and 2018. On average over the two years, it yielded more than any common check varieties, including Joe. KS Western Star has resistances to stripe rust, leaf rust and soilborne mosaic virus. It has very good straw strength and grain shattering resistance along with good milling and baking qualities. KS Western Star has good pre-harvest sprouting resistance.

KS Western Star has very good drought tolerance and high yield potential. While it is susceptible to Hessian fly and wheat streak mosaic virus, it has wheat curl mite resistance and intermediate resistance to Triticum mosaic virus.

KS Dallas

KS Dallas was named after retired plant pathologist Dr. Dallas Seifers, who worked at the K-State Agricultural Research Center in Hays and helped to develop the WSM2 gene found in the varieties KS Dallas and Joe. It is adapted to the western half of Kansas, eastern Colorado, northwest Oklahoma, the Texas panhandle and southwest Nebraska.

KS Dallas is a medium maturity and medium height variety. It performed well in western Kansas in 2017 and 2018. KS Dallas has a strong disease package with wheat streak mosaic virus resistance up to 70°F, which is three degrees higher than those resistant varieties with WSM2, such as Joe and Oakley CL. It has moderate resistance to stripe rust and good resistance to leaf rust and stem rust. It is susceptible to soilborne mosaic virus and moderately susceptible to Hessian fly. It has good shattering resistance and pre-harvest sprouting resistance. Its straw strength is about average, which is similar to T158.

KS Dallas has good milling and baking qualities. In general, it has good flour yield, high water absorption and good mixing tolerance.

KS Silverado

KS Silverado is a hard white wheat with medium-early maturity and medium-short height. It is adapted to central and western Kansas. It has very good pre-harvest sprouting resistance. Its shattering resistance is moderate, which is similar to Joe. Its straw strength is very good.

KS Silverado showed resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus in inoculated tests in the growth chamber at 64°F. It has moderate to intermediate resistance to stripe and stem rusts, and wheat blast. It is resistant to leaf rust, Hessian fly, and soilborne mosaic virus. It is moderately susceptible to Fusarium head blight, barley yellow dwarf virus and powdery mildew. Preliminary data showed that it has intermediate resistance to Triticum mosaic virus.

Whether you are looking for high grain yield, rust resistance, heat and drought tolerance, resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus or milling and baking quality, Kansas State University’s wheat breeding program has a variety for you. These three new varieties will be available to Kansas wheat farmers in fall 2020 through Kansas Wheat Alliance associates. Visit kswheatalliance.org for more information on these and other wheat variety options.