Tag Archives: Nebraska

The U.S. Grains Council (USGC) in conjunction with the Nebraska Corn Board and the Iowa Corn Promotion Board will soon bring a Japanese trade team of feed milling professionals to the United States. While here, the team will visit Nebraska, Iowa and Washington to better understand the U.S. corn marketing system and pave the way for continued growth in grain, ethanol and co-product sales to the country.

The team of five, including feed milling decision makers, are in the United States to see firsthand U.S. corn, co-products and ethanol production, meeting directly with U.S. suppliers and exporters.

“Prospective corn buyers from any country want to experience every point in the value chain. That’s why the Council strives to bring buyers together with sellers to facilitate trade around the world,” said Ryan LeGrand, president and CEO of the U.S. Grains Council. “Japan has been a longstanding trading partner with the U.S. and is our second largest buyer of grains in all forms. We are excited to educate these newer, less-experienced Japanese feed corn millers, showcase major production facilities and farms in our country and demonstrate just how proud we are of the corn quality in the U.S., so we can continue to cement these relationships for U.S. farmers and Japanese end-users for years to come.”

Japan ranks as the second largest buyer of U.S. corn and U.S. sorghum, the third largest market for U.S. barley and the ninth largest buyer of U.S. DDGS.

Japan more than doubled U.S. ethanol imports to 934,000 gallons (331,000 bushels in corn equivalent) in 2017/2018, the most since 2010/2011. Using information provided by the Council, the Japanese Ministry of Economy (METI) modified its policy in 2018 to allow U.S. corn-based ethanol in the market based on technological advancements that raised the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction level of U.S. corn-based ethanol and allowed near-term imports of ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE) made with nearly 100 million gallons of ethanol.

“Nebraska has a long-standing tradition and reputation of producing quality ag products,” said David Bruntz, chairman of the Nebraska Corn Board. “We’re appreciative of Japan’s business and we’re working to strengthen this relationship well into the future. I’m excited for this group to be in our great state.”

During their time in Iowa and Nebraska, participants will visit a corn farm operation, grain elevator with a rail terminal, ethanol plant and feed mill before flying to Washington to stop in at an export terminal where they will see how grain is sampled and goes through grain inspection before making its way to Japan.

 

 

Over the last several years, Nebraska Corn has provided real-world experiences and opportunities for college interns. These students work directly with Nebraska Corn cooperating organizations including the U.S. Grains Council, the U.S. Meat Export Federation and the National Corn Growers Association.

Each year, Nebraska Corn offers several internship opportunities. Six of the internships are located outside of the state and the other two are located in the offices of the Nebraska Corn Board and the Nebraska Corn Growers Association, both in Lincoln, Nebraska. All eight opportunities are paid internship experiences. Applications for these internships are now available at www.nebraskacorn.gov! Descriptions and applications deadlines can be found below.

2020-2021 Internship Opportunities

Communications and Outreach Internship
Host: Nebraska Corn Growers Association
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Duration: May 2020 – May 2021
Application Due Date: Nov. 1, 2019

**New Option for 2020**
International Relations Internship (Deadline quickly approaching!)
Host: U.S. Grains Council
Location: Washington, D.C.
Duration: Jan. 2020 – May 2020 (with option to continue for a full year)
Application Due Date: Oct. 4, 2019

Communications and Market Development Internship (Deadline quickly approaching!)
Host: Nebraska Corn Board
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Duration: September 2019 – May 2020
Application Due Date: Sept. 20, 2019

Communications and Market Development Internship
Host: Nebraska Corn Board
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Duration: May 2020 – May 2021
Application Due Date: Nov. 1, 2019

Marketing and Communications Internship
Host: National Corn Growers Association
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Duration: Summer 2020
Application Due Date: Nov. 1, 2019

Public Policy Internship
Host: National Corn Growers Association
Location: Washington, D.C.
Duration: Summer 2020
Application Due Date: Nov. 1, 2019

Promotion and International Relations Internship
Host: U.S. Meat Export Federation
Location: Denver, Colorado
Duration: Summer 2020
Application Due Date: Nov. 1, 2019

International Relations Internship
Host: U.S. Grains Council
Location: Washington, D.C.
Duration: Summer 2020
Application Due Date: Nov. 1, 2019

International Agricultural Relations Internship
Host: U.S. Grains Council
Location: Panama City, Panama
Duration: Summer 2020
Application Due Date: Nov. 1, 2019

 

 

LINCOLN – Governor Pete Ricketts and Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) Director Steve Wellman issued statements following news that radical anti-agriculture groups had called for a moratorium on livestock production in Nebraska.

“Let’s be clear: The out-of-state environmental lobbying groups rallying opposition against our family farmers in Nebraska are anti-agriculture,” said Governor Ricketts.  “Left unchecked, they would destroy our way of life.  This attempt to stop livestock development in Nebraska is a part of the ‘meat is murder’ movement led by radical groups who want to end livestock production around the globe.  I urge Nebraskans in our local communities to rise up and protect family farms and stand with our livestock producers across our state.”

“Agriculture is the backbone of Nebraska’s economy, and it is extremely disheartening to learn that there are groups of citizens in our own state that are working to essentially eliminate the livestock industry,” said NDA Director Wellman.  “As the director of the Nebraska Department of Agriculture, I strongly support all aspects of Nebraska agriculture and the farmers and ranchers that work tirelessly contributing to Nebraska’s economic well-being through livestock production.  CAFO’s are well thought out and planned operations across Nebraska with plans that work to address environmental impacts, nutrient management and animal health to efficiently deliver a high quality, safe food supply.”

The following statement can be attributed to Craig Head as spokesman for the Nebraska Farm Bureau.

LINCOLN, NEB. – “Livestock farming is part of the heritage and fabric of Nebraska and a critical part of Nebraska agriculture. Enacting a statewide moratorium to stop new livestock farms would be the equivalent of halting the growth of rural Nebraska. Livestock farms support our rural communities, strengthen our state’s economy, and keep Nebraska strong.”

“The notion that a moratorium is needed ignores the realities of what farmers must do to build and operate a new livestock farm. Nebraska farmers go through an extensive process and must adhere to numerous local, state, and federal regulations, governing everything from where barns can be located, to how they operate for the protection of natural resources and the environment. A moratorium on Nebraska livestock farms, as has been proposed by some environmental and activist groups, would be nothing short of a disservice to Nebraska farmers, our rural communities, and our state.”

LINCOLN, Neb. — Nebraska LEAD (Leadership Education/Action Development) Group 39 participants have been announced by the program’s director, Terry Hejny. The two-year program will begin in September.

   The newest members of Nebraska’s premier two-year agricultural leadership development program are involved in production agriculture and/or agribusiness in Nebraska. 

“Once again, it appears that Class 39 is filled with outstanding individuals from throughout our state and I am excited to get started with them. Our task will be to prepare and motivate them for future leadership roles in their community, our state and beyond,” Hejny said.

LEAD Fellows will participate in 12 monthly three-day seminars across Nebraska, a 10-day national study/travel seminar and a 14-16 day international study/travel seminar. The goal of the program is to develop problem solvers, decision makers and spokespersons for Nebraska agriculture and beyond.

Seminar themes include: leadership assessment and potential, natural resources and energy, leadership through communication, agricultural policy, international trade and finance, Nebraska’s political process, global perspectives, nuclear energy, social and cultural issues, understanding and developing leadership skills, agribusiness and marketing, information technology, advances in health care, the resources and people of Nebraska’s Panhandle and other areas designed to develop leaders through exposure to a broad array of current topics and issues and how they interrelate.

The Nebraska LEAD Program is sponsored by the non-profit Nebraska Agricultural Leadership Council in cooperation with the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and 12 other institutions of higher education throughout Nebraska.

Nebraska LEAD 39 Fellows by city/town are: 

ALBION: John Krohn

ARTHUR: Jason Christensen

BELLEVUE: John Bronner, Derek Brown 

BLUE HILL: Alex Buschow

CLARKSON: Mike Podany

CLATONIA: Monte Murkle

COLON: Jeff Meduna

COLUMBUS: Justin Lorenz

COZAD: Zack Jenner

ELGIN: Tiffany Hemenway

GRAND ISLAND: Andy Paul 

HOLDREGE: Molly Trausch

HORDVILLE: Rebekah Nortrup

KEARNEY: Elyse Schlake 

LINCOLN: Travis Harrison, Laurel Mastro, Blythe McAfee, Brett Muhlbach, Tony Sibert

MULLEN: Kory Phillips

NELIGH: Koryn Koinzan

OMAHA:, Craig Davidson, Benjamin Grabenstein, Ashley Peters

STROMSBURG: Cale Pallas

SUTHERLAND: Thomas Kelly, Zachary Paulman

SUTTON: Jesse Mohnike

UTICA: Mindy Wolf

Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture as Curtis is well known for being a, “Small Campus With A Big Impact.” One way NCTA connects and helps students grow is through academic teams like Livestock judging, rodeo, ranch horse, and shooting sports. Still one of the fastest growing and most popular teams on campus is the Stock Dog club. Leighlynn Obermiller is an NCTA alumni and stock dog club member. While competing at the 150th State Fair Obermiller detailed how the Stock Dog Club helped her inside and outside the classroom. Obermiller has also carried lessons learned to the job place working as a rural vet tech in Central Nebraska.

Follow along and learn more about NCTA and the Stock Dog Club: