Tag Archives: soybeans

Consumer demand for sustainable products continues to increase, and soy is ready to deliver. For artificial grass, soy plays a significant role in the product’s sustainable success. From putting greens to playgrounds and landscaping to lawns, soy-backed synthetic turf has become an attractive option for a number of diverse residential and commercial uses.

Universal Textile Technologies, with research investment from the soy checkoff, recognized soy’s potential to contribute to the sustainability of its products. UTT developed BioCel and EnviroCel synthetic grass backing using soy-based polyols to replace all of the performance attributes of petroleum-based polyurethane. Soy-based polyols add the advantages of price stability, lower carbon emissions and improved air quality.

Following successful product development to expand from replacing petroleum-based backing to latex backing, UTT provided its soy-based technology to SYNLawn. The largest artificial grass manufacturer in the U.S., SYNLawn operates in the commercial, residential and golf synthetic grass landscape markets, with products carried by retailers such as Lowes and Ace Hardware.

SYNLawn broke new ground in the industry, producing the first USDA-certified, bio-based artificial turf in the industry. Today, SYNLawn estimates their products have replaced up to 60% of the petroleum-based polyol with soy-based polyol. SYNLawn says their customers report a more than 50% reduction in water use and lower landfill impact with the longer projected life cycles. Additionally, SYNLawn’s artificial grass is 100% recyclable, and the company says it finds it has superior durability to petroleum-based products.

“SYNLawn turf has the natural qualities of real grass in appearance and feel. The product is as innovative as it is beautiful and functional,” says Kyle Bridgeforth, a partner with fifth-generation Bridgeforth Farms in Tanner, Alabama, which grows soybeans, wheat, cotton and other row crops. Through a United Soybean Board leadership program, Bridgeforth traveled to New York City to learn more about soy-based products.

“The SYNLawn turf we experienced at the Standard Hotel’s Le Bain rooftop was cool and soft to the touch. It collapsed under your feet like regular grass,” he adds, likening the SYNLawn artificial turf’s look to a real, well-manicured golf course.

A number of diverse industries and customer groups see all the benefits too. Several have stepped into SYNLawn’s artificial turf market, including federal agencies meeting looking to meet new water reduction requirements. Agencies must cut water use for industrial, landscaping and ag consumption by 2% annually through fiscal year 2025.

One highly visible SYNLawn customer is the historic Del Mar Race Track in southern California, operated by the Del Mar Thoroughbred Club. The second largest horse-racing venue in the western United States, the site also hosts more than a million visitors attending national touring concerts, weddings and the county fair. Property managers turned to SYNLawn to install more than 8,500 square feet of turf in its paddock area.

Similarly, in Indianapolis, the Riley Children’s Health Sports Legends Experience, a 7.5-acre exhibit at The Children’s Museum, added SYNLawn product to a nearly an acre and a half of its outdoor area. And to create a happier environment for dogs in need of forever homes, SYNLawn installed artificial pet grass at the Humane Society of St. Lucie County, Florida. The additional play yard transformed an unused field into a fenced area where small dogs play and exercise.

“The SYNLawn representative we met was very enthusiastic about their use of soy. She expressed SYNLawn’s appreciation for soybean farmer-funded research and the collaborative effort with USB in promoting the product,” says Bridgeforth. “This is a prime example of how progressive ideas and great partnerships increase profitability for soybean farmers,”.

Finding new industrial uses for soy has been a long-time priority for the soy checkoff. Industrial uses generate additional soybean demand and have contributed to significant growth in the U.S. soybean industry — from $11 billion to $41 billion in the last 25 years.

“I am constantly amazed at how flexible and adaptable soy is for industrial uses,” says Woody Green, USB director from Lynchburg, South Carolina. “I am a long-time supporter of making checkoff investments in industrial uses, and USB for the coming year has invested in several new promising and innovative uses.”

USB-funded research and product development encourages more manufacturers like SYNLawn to choose soy, giving U.S. soybean farmers more profit opportunities.

“USB’s focus on industrial uses is a very important, needed use of our checkoff dollars,” says Russell Wolf, soybean farmer from Tipton, Missouri. “With all of the trade issues we have today, we must continue to find sustainable new uses for our soy — here and abroad.”

Wolf also traveled with USB’s leadership program to the Northeast to experience soy-based industrial products at the end of the value chain, something farmers don’t always get to see.

“Industrial uses are one area we can grow, and USB knows the importance of using our checkoff dollars to do so,” says Wolf.

“It was eye-opening to see soy used in an urban setting. Such industrial uses help increase demand beyond animal feed and biodiesel,” says Bridgeforth. “The more companies and industries use soybeans, the more confidence and exposure we gain in consumer markets. Ultimately, new partners and collaborations will grow soy demand.”

Higher corn & lower beans & wheat.  Frost concerns coupled with snow at weeks end.  South America’s planting underway.  Disappointing yields.  S&D report due out on Thursday, China will be here for two days of talks…is recent purchases “Good-will” gestures.  AFS & China.  Cattle see late week sales on Saturday.

Corn dented was 93%, corn mature was 58% and corn harvested was 15% as of Sunday, Oct. 6. Soybeans dropping leaves was 72%, and soybeans harvested was 14%, according to this week’s USDA NASS Crop Progress report.

Corn condition was rated 56% in good-to-excellent condition, down 1 percentage point from the previous week, while soybean condition was rated 53% good to excellent, down 2 percentage points from the previous week.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/….

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Dented 93 88 100 99
Corn Mature 58 43 92 85
Corn Harvested 15 11 33 27
Soybeans Dropping Leaves 72 55 90 87
Soybeans Harvested 14 7 31 34
Spring Wheat Harvested 91 90 100 99
Winter Wheat Planted 52 39 55 53
Winter Wheat Emerged 26 11 28 26
Cotton Bolls Opening 83 77 76 75
Cotton Harvested 25 16 24 20
Sorghum Mature 65 54 71 73
Sorghum Harvested 33 30 38 40
Rice Harvested 76 68 78 80

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP = Very Poor; P = Poor; F = Fair; G = Good; E = Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Corn 4 11 29 45 11 4 10 29 46 11 4 8 20 47 21
Soybeans 4 11 32 45 8 3 10 32 46 9 3 7 22 49 19
Cotton 4 15 42 32 7 3 17 40 34 6 6 19 33 32 10
Sorghum 2 5 28 51 14 2 6 27 50 15 5 11 29 44 11

**

National Soil Moisture Condition – 48 States
(VS = Very Short; SH = Short; AD = Adequate; SR = Surplus)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR
Topsoil Moisture 11 16 53 20 11 20 55 14 6 13 63 18
Subsoil Moisture 10 18 57 15 10 20 59 11 8 17 63 12

Corn dented was 88%, corn mature was 43% and corn harvested was 11% as of Sunday, Sept. 29. Soybeans dropping leaves was 55%, and soybeans harvested was 7%, according to this week’s USDA NASS Crop Progress report.

Corn condition was rated 57% in good-to-excellent condition, unchanged from the previous week, while soybean condition was rated 55% good to excellent, up 1 percentage point from the previous week.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/….

Clay Patton has the full audio report here:

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Dented 88 79 100 98
Corn Mature 43 29 84 73
Corn Harvested 11 7 25 19
Soybeans Dropping Leaves 55 34 81 76
Soybeans Harvested 7 NA 22 20
Spring Wheat Harvested 90 87 100 99
Winter Wheat Planted 39 22 41 38
Winter Wheat Emerged 11 NA 12 13
Cotton Bolls Opening 77 64 66 67
Cotton Harvested 16 11 19 14
Sorghum Coloring 95 90 97 95
Sorghum Mature 54 42 60 63
Sorghum Harvested 30 26 33 35
Barley Harvested 96 92 100 100
Rice Harvested 68 58 69 71

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP = Very Poor; P = Poor; F = Fair; G = Good; E = Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Corn 4 10 29 46 11 3 10 30 46 11 4 8 19 47 22
Soybeans 3 10 32 46 9 3 10 33 45 9 3 7 22 49 19
Cotton 3 17 40 34 6 3 16 42 32 7 6 19 33 32 10
Sorghum 2 6 27 50 15 2 6 27 51 14 6 11 29 44 10

**

National Soil Moisture Condition – 48 States
(VS = Very Short; SH = Short; AD = Adequate; SR = Surplus)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR
Topsoil Moisture 11 20 55 14 11 22 55 12 7 16 64 13
Subsoil Moisture 10 20 59 11 9 23 58 10 9 19 62 10

Trade talks continue this week between the U.S. and China as the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement inches closer to reality. President Donald Trump says talks last week between the U.S. and China “were very positive.”

Negotiations will continue this week ahead of high-level talks planned sometime next month. A Chinese delegation canceled U.S. farm visits last week, but apparently not because of the ongoing trade negotiations. Officials say the trips were canceled to avoid excessive media attention. Meanwhile, Democrats in the House of Representatives plan to submit a counter proposal to the White House this week on changes to USMCA, according to Politico.

House Ways and Means Chairman Richard Neal says the USCMA working group would meet with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer this week to “intensify the discussion.” Neal is hopeful the group and Lighthizer can “strike a deal soon,” that allows the House to vote on the agreement. Neal says the concerns raised by Democrats are not resolved but added the Trump administration has “made substantial progress.”

 The percentage of U.S. corn and soybeans that has reached maturity fell further behind the five-year average last week, according to USDA NASS’ latest Crop Progress report released Monday.

As of Sunday, 29% of corn was estimated as mature, well behind 69% at the same time last year and 28 percentage points behind the five-year average of 57%. That’s further behind average than in last week’s report, when maturity was running 21 percentage points behind the five-year average.

Corn in the dough stage was estimated at 96%, 4 percentage points behind the five-year average of 100%. Corn dented was 79%, 15 percentage points behind the five-year average of 94%.

“Michigan has the lowest rate of denting at 53% with Ohio, North Dakota and Wisconsin all below 60%,” said DTN Lead Analyst Todd Hultman.

Nationwide, corn harvest progressed 3 percentage points to reach 7% as of Sunday, behind last year 15% and 4 percentage points behind the five-year average of 11%.

The condition of corn still in fields was estimated at 57% good to excellent, up 2 percentage points from the previous week, but still the lowest good-to-excellent rating for the crop at this time of year since 2013.

Like corn, the percentage of soybeans reaching maturity fell further behind the average pace last week. NASS estimated that, as of Sunday, 34% of soybeans were dropping leaves, 25 percentage points behind the five-year average of 59%. That was further behind average than in last week’s report, when soybeans dropping leaves was 23 percentage points behind the five-year average.

Soybean condition held steady at 54% good to excellent. As with corn, that remains the lowest good-to-excellent rating since 2013, Hultman said.

Spring wheat harvest maintained its slow but steady progress last week, reaching 87% as of Sunday, 10 percentage points behind the five-year average of 97%. Montana and North Dakota remain the two slowest states at 80% and 85% harvested, respectively, Hultman said.

Winter wheat planting progress, on the other hand, remained near the average pace at 22% complete as of Sunday, compared to the five-year average of 24%.

Sorghum coloring was estimated at 90%, equal to the five-year average. Sorghum mature was estimated at 42%, behind the average of 53%. Sorghum harvested reached 26%, behind the five-year average of 31%. Barley harvested reached 92%, behind the average of 99%. Oats were 96% harvested, also behind the average of 99%.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/….

Clay Patton has the full report here:

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Dough 96 93 100 100
Corn Dented 79 68 96 94
Corn Mature 29 18 69 57
Corn Harvested 7 4 15 11
Soybeans Dropping Leaves 34 15 68 59
Spring Wheat Harvested 87 76 99 97
Winter Wheat Planted 22 8 26 24
Cotton Bolls Opening 64 54 57 57
Cotton Harvested 11 9 16 11
Sorghum Coloring 90 79 93 90
Sorghum Mature 42 34 49 53
Sorghum Harvested 26 24 29 31
Barley Harvested 92 87 99 99
Oats Harvested 96 92 100 99
Rice Harvested 58 46 63 61

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP = Very Poor; P = Poor; F = Fair; G = Good; E = Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Corn 3 10 30 46 11 4 10 31 44 11 4 8 19 47 22
Soybeans 3 10 33 45 9 4 10 32 45 9 3 7 22 49 19
Cotton 3 16 42 32 7 3 14 42 34 7 7 22 32 29 10
Sorghum 2 6 27 51 14 1 6 28 51 14 5 11 29 45 10

**

National Soil Moisture Condition – 48 States
(VS = Very Short; SH = Short; AD = Adequate; SR = Surplus)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR
Topsoil Moisture 11 22 55 12 11 22 55 12 8 18 63 11
Subsoil Moisture 9 23 58 10 9 22 59 10 10 20 61 9

TOPEKA, Kan. — The Kansas Soybean Commission (KSC) is requesting research and education proposals for its fiscal year 2021, which begins July 1, 2020. Proposals are due Oct. 15, and an individual may be listed as the principal investigator or educator on only one. The commissioners will review ideas for breeding, production and environmental programs; animal- and human-nutrition or food-safety studies; commercially significant, value-added projects that will use large quantities of soybeans; and domestic or international marketing and transportation programs.

More information about KSC’s priorities, complete instructions and application forms are available at https://KansasSoybeans.org/forms on the web or by calling the Kansas Soybean office at 877-KS-SOYBEAN (877-577-6923). Proposers who gain preliminary approval from the commissioners will make formal presentations Dec. 5-7 in Topeka or via teleconferencing.

The three-day funding meeting will begin at 8 a.m. each day. The commissioners also will discuss current projects, market-development activities, educational programs and administrative items. To obtain a complete agenda or to suggest additional topics for deliberation, contact KSC Administrator Kenlon Johannes at johannes@kansassoybeans.org or at the office.

U.S. corn and soybean conditions held mostly steady last week, but both crops are still significantly behind the average pace in reaching maturity, according to USDA NASS’ latest Crop Progress report released Monday.

NASS estimated that, as of Sunday, Sept. 15, the U.S. corn crop was 55% in good-to-excellent condition, unchanged from the previous week. That’s still the lowest good-to-excellent rating for the crop at this time of year since 2013.

Only 18% of corn was estimated mature as of Sunday, according to NASS. Last year at this same time, half of the crop (51%) had reached maturity. The current maturity is also 21 percentage points behind the five-year average of 39%. That’s further behind average than in last Monday’s report, when maturity was 13 percentage points behind the five-year average.

Corn in the dough stage was estimated at 93%, 5 percentage points behind the five-year average of 98%. Corn dented was 68%, 19 percentage points behind the five-year average of 87%.

“Fifty percent or less of corn is dented in Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin and South Dakota,” said DTN Lead Analyst Todd Hultman.

In its first corn harvest report of the season, NASS estimated that 4% of the crop had been harvested as of Sunday, led by activity in North Carolina and Texas. That compares to last year’s 8% harvested and the five-year average of 7%.

While corn condition was unchanged last week, the condition of the nation’s soybean crop fell slightly from 55% good to excellent the previous week to 54% as of Sunday. As with corn, that remains the lowest good-to-excellent rating since 2013, Hultman said.

Soybeans setting pods reached 95% as of Sunday, behind both last year’s and the average pace of 100%. Soybeans dropping leaves was estimated at 15%, far behind last year when half of the crop had leaves dropping and 23 percentage points behind the five-year average of 38%.

Spring wheat harvest slowed last week, moving ahead only 5 percentage points from the previous week to reach 76% as of Sunday. That is 17 percentage points behind the five-year average of 93%. Montana remains the slowest to harvest, at 69% complete, Hultman noted.

Planting of next year’s winter wheat crop was estimated at 8% complete as of Sunday, according to NASS, slightly behind the average pace of 12%.

“The top three states getting early starts to planting winter wheat were Washington, Colorado and Nebraska,” Hultman said.

Sorghum coloring was estimated at 79%, behind the average of 84%. Sorghum mature was estimated at 34%, behind the average of 44%. Sorghum harvested was estimated at 24%, behind the five-year average of 27%. Barley harvested reached 87%, behind the average of 96%. Oats were 92% harvested, also behind the average of 97%.

Cotton bolls opening was estimated at 54%, ahead of the average of 47%. Cotton harvested was estimated at 9%, near the five-year average of 8%. Cotton condition — for the portion of the crop still in fields — was rated 41% good to excellent, down 2 percentage points from the previous week’s 43% good-to-excellent rating. Rice harvested was 46%, slightly behind the average of 48%.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/…. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

Clay Patton breaks down the report here: https://c1.futuripost.com/krvnam/playlist/futures-one-crop-progress-report-not-a-big-change-7645.html

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Dough 93 89 99 98
Corn Dented 68 55 92 87
Corn Mature 18 11 51 39
Corn Harvested 4 NA 8 7
Soybeans Setting Pods 95 92 100 100
Soybeans Dropping Leaves 15 NA 50 38
Spring Wheat Harvested 76 71 96 93
Winter Wheat Planted 8 NA 12 12
Cotton Bolls Opening 54 43 48 47
Cotton Harvested 9 7 13 8
Sorghum Coloring 79 65 87 84
Sorghum Mature 34 27 40 44
Sorghum Harvested 24 22 26 27
Barley Harvested 87 82 95 96
Oats Harvested 92 89 96 97
Rice Harvested 46 30 48 48

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP = Very Poor; P = Poor; F = Fair; G = Good; E = Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Corn 4 10 31 44 11 4 10 31 45 10 4 8 20 47 21
Soybeans 4 10 32 45 9 3 9 33 45 10 3 7 23 49 18
Cotton 3 14 42 34 7 3 15 39 37 6 8 24 29 30 9
Sorghum 1 6 28 51 14 1 5 26 53 15 5 12 30 44 9
Rice 1 5 25 47 22 1 5 25 46 23 4 22 58 16

**

National Soil Moisture Condition – 48 States
(VS = Very Short; SH = Short; AD = Adequate; SR = Surplus)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR
Topsoil Moisture 11 22 55 12 10 23 61 6 9 19 63 9
Subsoil Moisture 9 22 59 10 8 22 64 6 11 20 61 8

Corn was rated 55% in good-to-excellent condition, down 3 percentage points from 58% the previous week, while soybean condition was also rated 55%, unchanged from the previous week, according to this week’s USDA NASS Crop Progress report.

Corn in the dough stage was 89%, corn dented was 55% and corn mature was 11%. Soybeans setting pods reached 92%.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/…. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

Clay Patton breaks down the report: https://c1-green.futuripost.com/krvnam/playlist/futures-one-crop-progress-report-corn-condition-drops-7600.html

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Dough 89 81 99 97
Corn Dented 55 41 84 77
Corn Mature 11 6 33 24
Soybeans Setting Pods 92 86 100 99
Spring Wheat Harvested 71 55 92 87
Cotton Bolls Opening 43 36 38 37
Cotton Harvested 7 NA 9 6
Sorghum Headed 97 92 99 98
Sorghum Coloring 65 52 78 74
Sorghum Mature 27 24 33 37
Sorghum Harvested 22 21 24 24
Barley Harvested 82 72 91 92
Oats Harvested 89 84 96 95
Rice Harvested 30 21 39 37

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP = Very Poor; P = Poor; F = Fair; G = Good; E = Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Corn 4 10 31 45 10 3 10 29 47 11 4 8 20 47 21
Soybeans 3 9 33 45 10 3 10 32 46 9 3 7 22 50 18
Cotton 3 15 39 37 6 1 14 37 39 9 13 21 28 29 9
Sorghum 1 5 26 53 15 1 5 27 53 14 5 12 30 42 11
Rice 1 5 25 46 23 1 4 25 47 23 3 22 59 16

**

National Soil Moisture Condition – 48 States
(VS = Very Short; SH = Short; AD = Adequate; SR = Surplus)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR
Topsoil Moisture 10 23 61 6 9 22 62 7 9 19 58 14
Subsoil Moisture 8 22 64 6 7 22 65 6 10 23 58 9